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Volume and its relationship to cardiac output and venous return

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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79 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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69 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
331 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Volume and its relationship to cardiac output and venous return
Published in
Critical Care, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13054-016-1438-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. Magder

Abstract

Volume infusions are one of the commonest clinical interventions in critically ill patients yet the relationship of volume to cardiac output is not well understood. Blood volume has a stressed and unstressed component but only the stressed component determines flow. It is usually about 30 % of total volume. Stressed volume is relatively constant under steady state conditions. It creates an elastic recoil pressure that is an important factor in the generation of blood flow. The heart creates circulatory flow by lowering the right atrial pressure and allowing the recoil pressure in veins and venules to drain blood back to the heart. The heart then puts the volume back into the systemic circulation so that stroke return equals stroke volume. The heart cannot pump out more volume than comes back. Changes in cardiac output without changes in stressed volume occur because of changes in arterial and venous resistances which redistribute blood volume and change pressure gradients throughout the vasculature. Stressed volume also can be increased by decreasing vascular capacitance, which means recruiting unstressed volume into stressed volume. This is the equivalent of an auto-transfusion. It is worth noting that during exercise in normal young males, cardiac output can increase five-fold with only small changes in stressed blood volume. The mechanical characteristics of the cardiac chambers and the circulation thus ultimately determine the relationship between volume and cardiac output and are the subject of this review.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 79 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 331 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 324 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 46 14%
Other 43 13%
Student > Master 42 13%
Student > Bachelor 35 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 10%
Other 85 26%
Unknown 48 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 202 61%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 5%
Engineering 16 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 3%
Sports and Recreations 6 2%
Other 18 5%
Unknown 62 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 48. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 December 2019.
All research outputs
#479,107
of 16,073,961 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#371
of 5,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,049
of 267,446 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#6
of 62 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,073,961 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,073 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,446 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 62 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.