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GST activity and membrane lipid saturation prevents mesotrione-induced cellular damage in Pantoea ananatis

Overview of attention for article published in AMB Express, September 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

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1 Facebook page

Citations

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19 Dimensions

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36 Mendeley
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Title
GST activity and membrane lipid saturation prevents mesotrione-induced cellular damage in Pantoea ananatis
Published in
AMB Express, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13568-016-0240-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lilian P. Prione, Luiz R. Olchanheski, Leandro D. Tullio, Bruno C. E. Santo, Péricles M. Reche, Paula F. Martins, Giselle Carvalho, Ivo M. Demiate, Sônia A. V. Pileggi, Manuella N. Dourado, Rosilene A. Prestes, Michael J. Sadowsky, Ricardo A. Azevedo, Marcos Pileggi

Abstract

Callisto(®), containing the active ingredient mesotrione (2-[4-methylsulfonyl-2-nitrobenzoyl]1,3-cyclohenanedione), is a selective herbicide that controls weeds in corn crops and is a potential environmental contaminant. The objective of this work was to evaluate enzymatic and structural changes in Pantoea ananatis, a strain isolated from water, in response to exposure to this herbicide. Despite degradation of mesotrione, probably due a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pathway in Pantoea ananatis, this herbicide induced oxidative stress by increasing hydrogen peroxide production. Thiol fragments, eventually produced after mesotrione degradation, could be involved in increased GST activity. Nevertheless, there was no peroxidation damage related to this production, as malondialdehyde (MDA) synthesis, which is due to lipid peroxidation, was highest in the controls, followed by the mesotrione- and Callisto(®)-treated cultures at log growth phase. Therefore, P. ananatis can tolerate and grow in the presence of the herbicide, probably due an efficient control of oxidative stress by a polymorphic catalase system. MDA rates depend on lipid saturation due to a pattern change to a higher level of saturation. These changes are likely related to the formation of GST-mesotrione conjugates and mesotrione degradation-specific metabolites and to the presence of cytotoxic adjuvants. These features may shift lipid membrane saturation, possibly providing a protective effect to bacteria through an increase in membrane impermeability. This response system in P. ananatis provides a novel model for bacterial herbicide tolerance and adaptation in the environment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 17%
Student > Bachelor 5 14%
Other 3 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 12 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 17%
Computer Science 2 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 11 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 September 2016.
All research outputs
#4,222,873
of 8,372,629 outputs
Outputs from AMB Express
#158
of 503 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,973
of 252,190 outputs
Outputs of similar age from AMB Express
#16
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,372,629 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 503 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,190 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.