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Prioritizing Cross-Disciplinary Teaching and Learning and Patient Safety in Hospital-Based Environments

Overview of attention for article published in The AMA Journal of Ethic, September 2016
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31 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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19 Mendeley
Title
Prioritizing Cross-Disciplinary Teaching and Learning and Patient Safety in Hospital-Based Environments
Published in
The AMA Journal of Ethic, September 2016
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2016.18.9.ecas1-1609
Pubmed ID
Abstract

In this case scenario, Darvid is a medical student who perceives that practicing his physical examination of a patient at a specific time conflicts with nursing care. His predicament highlights the importance of interprofessional communication. Darvid is hesitant to communicate with the nurse, and his fear is exacerbated by the hierarchical structure of the academic health care setting, exemplified by the senior resident's dismissive response to his concerns. This paper argues that every opportunity should be made to prioritize students' learning but that the patient's needs must come first. The nurse in this case is in a position to help Darvid assess the priorities in this situation, but he must first feel comfortable discussing his concerns. Interprofessional education can serve a valuable role in facilitating open communication.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 31 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Librarian 1 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Researcher 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 12 63%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 11%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Unknown 13 68%