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Sex differences and similarities in depressive- and anxiety-like behaviour in the Wistar-Kyoto rat

Overview of attention for article published in Physiology & Behavior, December 2016
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2 tweeters

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39 Dimensions

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Title
Sex differences and similarities in depressive- and anxiety-like behaviour in the Wistar-Kyoto rat
Published in
Physiology & Behavior, December 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.physbeh.2016.08.031
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nikita N. Burke, Jonathan Coppinger, Daniel R. Deaver, Michelle Roche, David P. Finn, John Kelly

Abstract

Depression is a debilitating psychiatric disorder that is highly comorbid with anxiety. Depression is twice as prevalent in women as in men, however females remain underrepresented in preclinical research. The stress hyperresponsive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat displays hypolocomotion in a novel aversive environment and depressive- and anxiety-like behaviours, which have been mostly characterised in males. The current study characterised behaviour in male and female rats in a battery of behavioural paradigms. Adult male and female WKY rats were tested in the open field and forced swim tests (tests with a locomotor component); and the marble burying, novelty-induced hypophagia and sucrose preference tests (tests with a minimal locomotor component) and 24h home-cage locomotor activity was also monitored. The tests were compared against the Sprague-Dawley (SD) strain, a commonly used "control" strain. SD, but not WKY, females exhibited higher home-cage locomotor activity compared to males. In the open field, WKY rats of both sexes exhibited a significant reduction in locomotor activity and increased anxiety-like behaviour as demonstrated by reduced time in the aversive inner zone of the open field, compared to SD counterparts. In the marble burying test, WKY females, but not males, exhibited a trend towards increased burying, indicative of anxiety-like/neophobic behaviour. In comparison, WKY males, but not females, exhibited enhanced novelty-induced hypophagia, indicative of increased anxiety-like behaviour compared to SD rats. In the forced swim test, WKY rats of both sexes spent more time immobile compared with SD counterparts, indicating depressive-like behaviour. However, in comparison to SD rats, WKY males, but not females, exhibited anhedonic-like behaviour. In conclusion, WKY rats exhibit depressive- and anxiety-like behaviours that are complex and nuanced depending on the sex of the rat and testing conditions. This study supports the use of a varied test battery to fully characterise depression/anxiety-like behaviour in male and female rats.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 82 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 20%
Student > Master 13 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 11%
Researcher 4 5%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 18 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 23 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 6%
Psychology 5 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 30 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 September 2016.
All research outputs
#7,370,568
of 12,276,818 outputs
Outputs from Physiology & Behavior
#2,281
of 3,512 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,201
of 263,197 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Physiology & Behavior
#84
of 155 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,276,818 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,512 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,197 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 155 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.