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Moderate and prolonged hypercapnic acidosis may protect against ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction in healthy piglet: an in vivo study

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, January 2013
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3 tweeters

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31 Dimensions

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Moderate and prolonged hypercapnic acidosis may protect against ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction in healthy piglet: an in vivo study
Published in
Critical Care, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/cc12486
Pubmed ID
Abstract

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Protective ventilation by using limited airway pressures and ventilation may result in moderate and prolonged hypercapnic acidosis, as often observed in critically ill patients. Because allowing moderate and prolonged hypercapnia may be considered protective measure for the lungs, we hypothesized that moderate and prolonged hypercapnic acidosis may protect the diaphragm against ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction (VIDD). The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of moderate and prolonged (72 hours of mechanical ventilation) hypercapnic acidosis on in vivo diaphragmatic function. METHODS: Two groups of anesthetized piglets were ventilated during a 72-hour period. Piglets were assigned to the Normocapnia group (n = 6), ventilated in normocapnia, or to the Hypercapnia group (n = 6), ventilated with moderate hypercapnic acidosis (PaCO2 from 55 to 70 mm Hg) during the 72-hour period of the study. Every 12 hours, we measured transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) after bilateral, supramaximal transjugular stimulation of the two phrenic nerves to assess in vivo diaphragmatic contractile force. Pressure/frequency curves were drawn after stimulation from 20 to 120 Hz of the phrenic nerves. The protocol was approved by our institutional animal-care committee. RESULTS: Moderate and prolonged hypercapnic acidosis was well tolerated during the study period. The baseline pressure/frequency curves of the two groups were not significantly different (Pdi at 20 Hz, 32.7 ± 8.7 cm H2O, versus 34.4 ± 8.4 cm H2O; and at 120 Hz, 56.8 ± 8.7 cm H2O versus 60.8 ± 5.7 cm H2O, for Normocapnia and Hypercapnia groups, respectively). After 72 hours of ventilation, Pdi decreased by 25% of its baseline value in the Normocapnia group, whereas Pdi did not decrease in the Hypercapnia group. CONCLUSIONS: Moderate and prolonged hypercapnic acidosis limited the occurrence of VIDD during controlled mechanical ventilation in a healthy piglet model. Consequences of moderate and prolonged hypercapnic acidosis should be better explored with further studies before being tested on patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 3%
France 1 3%
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 33 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 14%
Professor 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 58%
Engineering 3 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 6 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2013.
All research outputs
#8,886,230
of 15,153,562 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#3,555
of 4,750 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,956
of 248,935 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#115
of 181 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,153,562 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,750 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,935 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 181 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.