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Cardiovascular disease incidence among females in South Carolina by type of oral contraceptives, 2000–2013: a retrospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Gynecology & Obstetrics, July 2016
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Title
Cardiovascular disease incidence among females in South Carolina by type of oral contraceptives, 2000–2013: a retrospective cohort study
Published in
Archives of Gynecology & Obstetrics, July 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00404-016-4143-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marsha E. Samson, Swann A. Adams, Anwar T. Merchant, Whitney D. Maxwell, Jiajia Zhang, Charles L. Bennett, James R. Hebert

Abstract

Certain types of oral contraceptives can produce favorable effects on lipid metabolism and vascular tone, while others have potentially detrimental effects. Endogenous and exogenous hormones exert different effects on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) depending on the type, combination, and dose of the hormone. The estrogenic and progestogenic effects of exogenous hormones on HDL and LDL are inconsistent. Studying surrogate end points (LDL, HDL levels) may provide a misleading picture of OCs. Medicaid data from 2000 to 2013 were used to assess the relationship between the type of OCs and CVD incidence. Multivariable logistic regression was used to model relationships between cardiovascular disease and OC use adjusting for potential confounders. Compared to combined oral contraceptives (COC), progestin-only oral contraceptives (POC) were associated with decreased heart disease and stroke incidence after adjusting for important covariates (OR 0.74; 95 % CI 0.57, 0.97 and OR 0.39; 95 % CI 0.16, 0.95, respectively). However, there was a positive association between POC + COC and both heart disease and stroke incidence (OR 2.28; 95 % CI 1.92, 2.70 and OR 2.12; 95 % CI 1.34, 3.35, respectively). In light of an association between POC use and decreased heart disease and stroke, women's CVD risk factors should be carefully considered when choosing which OC to use. Baseline CVD risk should be a part of the discussion between women and their primary care providers when making choices regarding OCs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 18 40%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Researcher 4 9%
Professor 1 2%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 8 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 16%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Materials Science 2 4%
Psychology 2 4%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 10 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 September 2016.
All research outputs
#9,771,175
of 12,228,342 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Gynecology & Obstetrics
#672
of 1,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#184,673
of 260,966 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Gynecology & Obstetrics
#21
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,228,342 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,060 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,966 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.