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Prolonged California aridity linked to climate warming and Pacific sea surface temperature

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
24 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
66 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
Title
Prolonged California aridity linked to climate warming and Pacific sea surface temperature
Published in
Scientific Reports, September 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep33325
Pubmed ID
Authors

Glen M. MacDonald, Katrina A. Moser, Amy M. Bloom, Aaron P. Potito, David F. Porinchu, James R. Holmquist, Julia Hughes, Konstantine V. Kremenetski

Abstract

California has experienced a dry 21(st) century capped by severe drought from 2012 through 2015 prompting questions about hydroclimatic sensitivity to anthropogenic climate change and implications for the future. We address these questions using a Holocene lake sediment record of hydrologic change from the Sierra Nevada Mountains coupled with marine sediment records from the Pacific. These data provide evidence of a persistent relationship between past climate warming, Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) shifts and centennial to millennial episodes of California aridity. The link is most evident during the thermal-maximum of the mid-Holocene (~8 to 3 ka; ka = 1,000 calendar years before present) and during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) (~1 ka to 0.7 ka). In both cases, climate warming corresponded with cooling of the eastern tropical Pacific despite differences in the factors producing increased radiative forcing. The magnitude of prolonged eastern Pacific cooling was modest, similar to observed La Niña excursions of 1(o) to 2 °C. Given differences with current radiative forcing it remains uncertain if the Pacific will react in a similar manner in the 21st century, but should it follow apparent past behavior more intense and prolonged aridity in California would result.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 66 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Puerto Rico 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 2 6%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 6 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 28%
Environmental Science 8 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 14%
Engineering 3 8%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 277. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2020.
All research outputs
#55,814
of 15,363,084 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#713
of 79,391 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,050
of 266,175 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#30
of 3,537 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,363,084 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,391 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,175 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,537 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.