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microRNA-mediated resistance to hypoglycemia in the HepG2 human hepatoma cell line

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, September 2016
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Title
microRNA-mediated resistance to hypoglycemia in the HepG2 human hepatoma cell line
Published in
BMC Cancer, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2762-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Satomi Ueki, Yuko Murakami, Shoji Yamada, Masaki Kimura, Yoshimasa Saito, Hidetsugu Saito

Abstract

It is generally accepted that the energy resources of cancer cells rely on anaerobic metabolism or the glycolytic system, even if they have sufficient oxygen. This is known as the Warburg effect. The cells skillfully survive under hypoglycemic conditions when their circumstances change, which probably at least partly involves microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation. To determine how cancer cells exploit miRNA-mediated epigenetic mechanisms to survive in hypoglycemic conditions, we used DNA microarray analysis to comprehensively and simultaneously compare the expression of miRNAs and mRNAs in the HepG2 human hepatoma cell line and in cultured normal human hepatocytes. The hypoglycemic condition decreased the expression of miRNA-17-5p and -20a-5p in hepatoma cells and consequently upregulated the expression of their target gene p21. These regulations were also confirmed by using antisense inhibitors of these miRNAs. In addition to this change, the hypoglycemic condition led to upregulated expression of heat shock proteins and increased resistance to caspase-3-induced apoptosis. However, we could not identify miRNA-mediated regulations, despite using comprehensive detection. Several interesting genes were also found to be upregulated in the hypoglycemic condition by the microarray analysis, probably because of responding to this cellular stress. These results suggest that cancer cells skillfully survive in hypoglycemic conditions, which frequently occur in malignancies, and that some of the gene regulation of this process is manipulated by miRNAs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 22%
Researcher 2 22%
Student > Master 2 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 11%
Unknown 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,366,811
of 8,389,481 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,242
of 3,521 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#165,503
of 233,813 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#102
of 176 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,389,481 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,521 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,813 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 176 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.