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The use of formative research to inform the design of a seasonal malaria chemoprevention intervention in northern Nigeria

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2016
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Title
The use of formative research to inform the design of a seasonal malaria chemoprevention intervention in northern Nigeria
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1526-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Clare E. Strachan, Musa Kana, Sandrine Martin, John Dada, Naome Wandera, Madeleine Marasciulo, Helen Counihan, Maxwell Kolawole, Tanimu Babale, Prudence Hamade, Sylvia R. Meek, Ebenezer Baba

Abstract

Experience of seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) is growing in the Sahel sub-region of Africa, though there remains insufficient evidence to recommend a standard deployment strategy. In 2012, a project was initiated in Katsina state, northern Nigeria, to design an appropriate and effective community-based delivery approach for SMC, in consultation with local stakeholders. Formative research (FR) was conducted locally to explore the potential feasibility and acceptability of SMC and to highlight information gaps and practical considerations to inform the intervention design. The FR adopted qualitative methods; 36 in-depth interviews and 18 focus group discussions were conducted across 13 target groups active across the health system and within the community. Analysis followed the 'framework' approach. The process for incorporating the FR results into the project design was iterative which was initiated by a week-long 'intervention design' workshop with relevant stakeholders. The FR highlighted both supportive and hindering factors to be considered in the intervention design. Malaria control was identified as a community priority, the community health workers were a trusted resource and the local leadership exerted strong influence over household decisions. However, there were perceived challenges with quality of care at both community and health facility levels, referral linkage and supportive supervision were weak, literacy levels lower than anticipated and there was the potential for suspicion of 'outside' interventions. There was broad consensus across target groups that community-based SMC drug delivery would better enable a high coverage of beneficiaries and potentially garner wider community support. A mixed approach was recommended, including both community fixed-point and household-to-household SMC delivery. The FR findings were used to inform the overall distribution strategy, mechanisms for integration into the health system, capacity building and training approaches, supportive interventions to strengthen the health system, and the social mobilization strategy. Formative research played a valuable role in exploring local socio-cultural contexts and health system realities. Both opportunities and challenges for the introduction of SMC delivery were highlighted, which were appropriately considered in the design of the project.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 94 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 27%
Researcher 19 20%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 13 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 20%
Social Sciences 10 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Other 16 17%
Unknown 19 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,083,850
of 8,414,405 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,330
of 2,958 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#165,118
of 254,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#89
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,414,405 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,958 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.