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Assimilation of virtual legs and perception of floor texture by complete paraplegic patients receiving artificial tactile feedback

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
83 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
153 Mendeley
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Title
Assimilation of virtual legs and perception of floor texture by complete paraplegic patients receiving artificial tactile feedback
Published in
Scientific Reports, September 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep32293
Pubmed ID
Authors

Solaiman Shokur, Simone Gallo, Renan C. Moioli, Ana Rita C. Donati, Edgard Morya, Hannes Bleuler, Miguel A.L. Nicolelis

Abstract

Spinal cord injuries disrupt bidirectional communication between the patient's brain and body. Here, we demonstrate a new approach for reproducing lower limb somatosensory feedback in paraplegics by remapping missing leg/foot tactile sensations onto the skin of patients' forearms. A portable haptic display was tested in eight patients in a setup where the lower limbs were simulated using immersive virtual reality (VR). For six out of eight patients, the haptic display induced the realistic illusion of walking on three different types of floor surfaces: beach sand, a paved street or grass. Additionally, patients experienced the movements of the virtual legs during the swing phase or the sensation of the foot rolling on the floor while walking. Relying solely on this tactile feedback, patients reported the position of the avatar leg during virtual walking. Crossmodal interference between vision of the virtual legs and tactile feedback revealed that patients assimilated the virtual lower limbs as if they were their own legs. We propose that the addition of tactile feedback to neuroprosthetic devices is essential to restore a full lower limb perceptual experience in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, and will ultimately, lead to a higher rate of prosthetic acceptance/use and a better level of motor proficiency.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 83 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 153 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Israel 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 150 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 24%
Student > Master 33 22%
Researcher 19 12%
Student > Bachelor 18 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 8%
Other 18 12%
Unknown 17 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 38 25%
Psychology 18 12%
Neuroscience 18 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 10%
Computer Science 8 5%
Other 31 20%
Unknown 24 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 79. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2017.
All research outputs
#332,762
of 17,829,815 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#3,904
of 96,247 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,017
of 276,836 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#165
of 3,382 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,829,815 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 96,247 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,836 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,382 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.