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Neighbourhood greenspace is associated with a slower decline in physical activity in older adults: A prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in SSM - Population Health , December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
16 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
91 Mendeley
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Title
Neighbourhood greenspace is associated with a slower decline in physical activity in older adults: A prospective cohort study
Published in
SSM - Population Health , December 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.ssmph.2016.09.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alice M. Dalton, Nick Wareham, Simon Griffin, Andrew P. Jones

Abstract

Maintaining physical activity in later life is important for maintaining health and function. Activity outdoors, such as walking, jogging and cycling, may provide an accessible, sociable and practical solution, but maintaining outdoor mobility may be a challenge in later life. Providing green environments which are supportive of physical activity may facilitate this, yet research into how greenspace could be best used is inconclusive. This study evaluates the role of greenspace in protecting against decline in physical activity over time in older adults. Data from the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer Norfolk, UK, cohort 1993-2009 (N=15,672) was used. Linear regression modelling was used to examine the association between exposure to greenspace in the home neighbourhood and change in overall, recreational and outdoor physical activity measured in terms of metabolic equivalent cost (MET) in hours/week. Mediation analysis was conducted to assess if dog walking explained the relationship between greenspace and physical activity change. Models were adjusted for known and hypothesised confounders. People living in greener neighbourhoods experienced less of a decline in physical activity than those living in less green areas. Comparing change for those living in the greenest versus least green quartiles, participants showed a difference in overall physical activity of 4.21 MET hours/week (trend P=0.001), adjusted for baseline physical activity, age, sex, BMI, social class and marital status. This difference was 4.03 MET hours/week for recreational physical activity (trend P<0.001) and 1.28 MET hours/week for outdoor physical activity (trend P=0.007). Dog walking partially mediated the association between greenspace and physical activity change, by 22.6% for overall, 28.1% for recreational and 50.0% for outdoor physical activity (all P<0.001). Greenspace in the home neighbourhood may be protective against decline in physical activity among older people as they age. Dog walking is a potential mechanism in this relationship, and warrants further investigation as a way of maintaining physical activity in later life.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 1%
Unknown 90 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 26%
Researcher 18 20%
Student > Master 11 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 4%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 13 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 15 16%
Social Sciences 13 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 13%
Psychology 8 9%
Sports and Recreations 5 5%
Other 16 18%
Unknown 22 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2020.
All research outputs
#912,585
of 16,017,651 outputs
Outputs from SSM - Population Health
#68
of 476 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,491
of 270,199 outputs
Outputs of similar age from SSM - Population Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,017,651 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 476 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,199 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them