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Differential influences of local subpopulations on regional diversity and differentiation for greater sage-grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus )

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology, August 2016
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Title
Differential influences of local subpopulations on regional diversity and differentiation for greater sage-grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus )
Published in
Molecular Ecology, August 2016
DOI 10.1111/mec.13776
Pubmed ID
Authors

Row, Jeffrey R., Oyler‐McCance, Sara J., Fedy, Bradley C., Row, Jeffery R, Oyler-McCance, Sara J, Fedy, Brad C

Abstract

The distribution of spatial genetic variation across a region can shape evolutionary dynamics and impact population persistence. Local population dynamics and among-population dispersal rates are strong drivers of this spatial genetic variation, yet for many species we lack a clear understanding of how these population processes interact in space to shape within-species genetic variation. Here, we used extensive genetic and demographic data from 10 subpopulations of greater sage-grouse to parameterize a simulated approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) model and 1) test for regional differences in population density and dispersal rates for greater sage-grouse subpopulations in Wyoming, and 2) quantify how these differences impact subpopulation regional influence on genetic variation. We found a close match between observed and simulated data under our parameterized model and strong variation in density and dispersal rates across Wyoming. Sensitivity analyses suggested that changes in dispersal (via landscape resistance) had a greater influence on regional differentiation, whereas changes in density had a greater influence on mean diversity across all subpopulations. Local subpopulations, however, varied in their regional influence on genetic variation. Decreases in the size and dispersal rates of central populations with low overall and net immigration (i.e., population sources) had the greatest negative impact on genetic variation. Overall, our results provide insight into the interactions among demography, dispersal, and genetic variation and highlight the potential of ABC to disentangle the complexity of regional population dynamics and project the genetic impact of changing conditions This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 4%
Canada 1 4%
Unknown 25 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 30%
Researcher 8 30%
Student > Master 5 19%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Lecturer 1 4%
Other 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 78%
Environmental Science 2 7%
Unspecified 2 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2016.
All research outputs
#7,267,932
of 8,409,255 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology
#3,374
of 3,472 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#209,579
of 253,630 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology
#100
of 105 outputs
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