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Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solid and Liquid Organic Fertilizers Applied to Lettuce

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Quality, November 2016
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Title
Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solid and Liquid Organic Fertilizers Applied to Lettuce
Published in
Journal of Environmental Quality, November 2016
DOI 10.2134/jeq2015.12.0623
Pubmed ID
Authors

Phasita Toonsiri, Stephen J. Del Grosso, Arina Sukor, Jessica G. Davis

Abstract

Improper application of nitrogen (N) fertilizer and environmental factors can cause the loss of nitrous oxide (NO) to the environment. Different types of fertilizers with different C/N ratios may have different effects on the environment. The focus of this study was to evaluate the effects of environmental factors and four organic fertilizers (feather meal, blood meal, fish emulsion, and cyano-fertilizer) applied at different rates (0, 28, 56, and 112 kg N ha) on NO emissions and to track CO emissions from a lettuce field ( L.). The study was conducted in 2013 and 2014 and compared preplant-applied solid fertilizers (feather meal and blood meal) and multiple applications of liquid fertilizers (fish emulsion and cyano-fertilizer). Three days a week, NO and CO emissions were measured twice per day in 2013 and once per day in 2014 using a closed-static chamber, and gas samples were analyzed by gas chromatography. Preplant-applied solid fertilizers significantly increased cumulative NO emissions as compared with control, but multiple applications of liquid fertilizers did not. Emission factors for NO ranged from 0 to 0.1% for multiple applications of liquid fertilizers and 0.6 to 11% for preplant-applied solid fertilizers, which could be overestimated due to chamber placement over fertilizer bands. In 2014, solid fertilizers with higher C/N ratios (3.3-3.5) resulted in higher CO emissions than liquid fertilizers (C/N ratio, 0.9-1.5). Therefore, organic farmers should consider the use of multiple applications of liquid fertilizers as a means to reduce soil greenhouse gas emissions while maintaining high yields.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 33%
Student > Bachelor 4 22%
Student > Master 3 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 17%
Environmental Science 2 11%
Social Sciences 1 6%
Unknown 4 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,385,410
of 8,414,405 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Quality
#1,040
of 1,276 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#178,474
of 253,738 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Quality
#29
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,414,405 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,276 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,738 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.