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Natural history of superficial head and neck squamous cell carcinoma under scheduled follow-up endoscopic observation with narrow band imaging: retrospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, September 2016
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Title
Natural history of superficial head and neck squamous cell carcinoma under scheduled follow-up endoscopic observation with narrow band imaging: retrospective cohort study
Published in
BMC Cancer, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2787-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hiroshi Nakamura, Tomonori Yano, Satoshi Fujii, Tomohiro Kadota, Toshifumi Tomioka, Takeshi Shinozaki, Ryuichi Hayashi, Kazuhiro Kaneko

Abstract

The incidence rate has been increasing for superficial head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) discovered through surveillance endoscopic study using narrow band imaging (NBI), a procedure mainly used for high-risk patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). However, there are few reports on the natural history of superficial HNSCC. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the natural history of superficial HNSCC. From January 2007 to December 2012, 535 consecutive histologically confirmed superficial HNSCCs at the oropharynx, hypopharynx, or larynx in 319 patients were detected by endoscopic surveillance examination by using NBI. Of those, 20 untreated and observed lesions fulfilled the eligibility criteria and were analyzed in this study. Twenty lesions from 17 patients were analyzed. All patients were men ranging from 52 to 86 years of age, with a median age of 69 years. The median endoscopic follow-up period was 20 months (range, 6-71); 17 lesions progressed in size. In this study, four patients died; the causes of death were synchronous ESCC, synchronous HNSCC, acute myocardial infarction, and unknown causes. No patient died from progression of superficial HNSCC. Most superficial HNSCC has the potential to change progressively. Therefore, superficial HNSCC should be detected at an early stage and be treated less invasively, such as with endoscopic resection or partial resection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 3 19%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 19%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 3 19%
Unknown 3 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 63%
Computer Science 2 13%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Unknown 3 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2016.
All research outputs
#7,275,833
of 8,418,826 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,824
of 3,525 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#209,461
of 253,723 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#113
of 164 outputs
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