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Spatial and temporal patterns of mercury concentrations in freshwater fish across the Western United States and Canada

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets

Citations

dimensions_citation
60 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
89 Mendeley
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Title
Spatial and temporal patterns of mercury concentrations in freshwater fish across the Western United States and Canada
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, October 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.03.229
Pubmed ID
Authors

Collin A. Eagles-Smith, Joshua T. Ackerman, James J. Willacker, Michael T. Tate, Michelle A. Lutz, Jacob A. Fleck, A. Robin Stewart, James G. Wiener, David C. Evers, Jesse M. Lepak, Jay A. Davis, Colleen Flanagan Pritz

Abstract

Methylmercury contamination of fish is a global threat to environmental health. Mercury (Hg) monitoring programs are valuable for generating data that can be compiled for spatially broad syntheses to identify emergent ecosystem properties that influence fish Hg bioaccumulation. Fish total Hg (THg) concentrations were evaluated across the Western United States (US) and Canada, a region defined by extreme gradients in habitat structure and water management. A database was compiled with THg concentrations in 96,310 fish that comprised 206 species from 4262 locations, and used to evaluate the spatial distribution of fish THg across the region and effects of species, foraging guilds, habitats, and ecoregions. Areas of elevated THg exposure were identified by developing a relativized estimate of fish mercury concentrations at a watershed scale that accounted for the variability associated with fish species, fish size, and site effects. THg concentrations in fish muscle ranged between 0.001 and 28.4 (μg/g wet weight (ww)) with a geometric mean of 0.17. Overall, 30% of individual fish samples and 17% of means by location exceeded the 0.30μg/g ww US EPA fish tissue criterion. Fish THg concentrations differed among habitat types, with riverine habitats consistently higher than lacustrine habitats. Importantly, fish THg concentrations were not correlated with sediment THg concentrations at a watershed scale, but were weakly correlated with sediment MeHg concentrations, suggesting that factors influencing MeHg production may be more important than inorganic Hg loading for determining fish MeHg exposure. There was large heterogeneity in fish THg concentrations across the landscape; THg concentrations were generally higher in semi-arid and arid regions such as the Great Basin and Desert Southwest, than in temperate forests. Results suggest that fish mercury exposure is widespread throughout Western US and Canada, and that species, habitat type, and region play an important role in influencing ecological risk of mercury in aquatic ecosystems.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Unknown 86 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 18%
Student > Master 14 16%
Other 8 9%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Other 16 18%
Unknown 11 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 30 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 4%
Chemistry 2 2%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 17 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 September 2016.
All research outputs
#1,713,525
of 15,557,767 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#1,554
of 14,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,886
of 268,864 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#48
of 359 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,557,767 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,864 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 359 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.