↓ Skip to main content

Native femoral anteversion should not be used as reference in cementless total hip arthroplasty with a straight, tapered stem: a retrospective clinical study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, September 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Native femoral anteversion should not be used as reference in cementless total hip arthroplasty with a straight, tapered stem: a retrospective clinical study
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12891-016-1255-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael Worlicek, Markus Weber, Benjamin Craiovan, Michael Wörner, Florian Völlner, Hans R. Springorum, Joachim Grifka, Tobias Renkawitz

Abstract

Improper femoral and acetabular component positioning can be associated with instability, impingement, component wear and finally patient dissatisfaction in total hip arthroplasty (THA). The concept of "femur first"/"combined anteversion", incorporates various aspects of performing a functional optimization of the prosthetic stem and cup position of the stem relative to the cup intraoperatively. In the present study we asked two questions: (1) Do native femoral anteversion and anteversion of the implant correlate? (2) Do anteversion of the final broach and implant anteversion correlate? In a secondary analysis of a prospective controlled trial, a subgroup of 55 patients, who underwent computer-assisted, cementless THA with a straight, tapered stem through an anterolateral, minimally invasive (MIS) approach in a lateral decubitus position were examined retrospectivly. Intraoperative fluoroscopy was used to verify a "best-fit" position of the final broach. An image-free navigation system was used for measurement of the native femoral version, version of the final broach and the final implant. Femoral neck resection height was measured in postoperative CT-scans. This investigation was approved by the local Ethics Commission (No.10-121-0263) and is a secondary analysis of a larger project (DRKS00000739, German Clinical Trials Register May-02-2011). The mean difference between native femoral version and final implant was 1.9° (+/- 9.5), with a range from -20.7° to 21.5° and a Spearman's correlation coefficient of 0.39 (p < 0.003). In contrast, we observed a mean difference between final broach and implant version of -1.9° (+/- 3.5), with a range from -12.7° to 8.7° and a Spearman's correlation coefficient of 0.89 (p < 0.001). In 83.6 % (46/55) final stem version was outside the normal range as defined by Tönnis (15-20°). The mean femoral neck resection height was 7.3 mm (+/- 5.6). There was no correlation between resection height and version of the implant (Spearman's correlation coefficient 0.14). Native femoral version significantly differs from the final anteversion of a cementless, straight, tapered stem and therefore is not a reliable reference in cementless THA. Measuring anteversion of the final "fit and fill" broach is a feasible assistance in order to predict final stem anteversion intraoperatively. There is no correlation between femoral neck resection height and version of the implant.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 21%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Other 4 10%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 6 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 54%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Engineering 2 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 9 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2017.
All research outputs
#7,154,048
of 9,711,563 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,632
of 2,283 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#168,582
of 259,249 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#45
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,711,563 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,283 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,249 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.