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Phenobarbital reduces EEG amplitude and propagation of neonatal seizures but does not alter performance of automated seizure detection

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Neurophysiology, October 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

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2 tweeters

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Phenobarbital reduces EEG amplitude and propagation of neonatal seizures but does not alter performance of automated seizure detection
Published in
Clinical Neurophysiology, October 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.clinph.2016.07.007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sean R. Mathieson, Vicki Livingstone, Evonne Low, Ronit Pressler, Janet M. Rennie, Geraldine B. Boylan

Abstract

Phenobarbital increases electroclinical uncoupling and our preliminary observations suggest it may also affect electrographic seizure morphology. This may alter the performance of a novel seizure detection algorithm (SDA) developed by our group. The objectives of this study were to compare the morphology of seizures before and after phenobarbital administration in neonates and to determine the effect of any changes on automated seizure detection rates. The EEGs of 18 term neonates with seizures both pre- and post-phenobarbital (524 seizures) administration were studied. Ten features of seizures were manually quantified and summary measures for each neonate were statistically compared between pre- and post-phenobarbital seizures. SDA seizure detection rates were also compared. Post-phenobarbital seizures showed significantly lower amplitude (p<0.001) and involved fewer EEG channels at the peak of seizure (p<0.05). No other features or SDA detection rates showed a statistical difference. These findings show that phenobarbital reduces both the amplitude and propagation of seizures which may help to explain electroclinical uncoupling of seizures. The seizure detection rate of the algorithm was unaffected by these changes. The results suggest that users should not need to adjust the SDA sensitivity threshold after phenobarbital administration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 16%
Student > Master 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 11 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 19%
Neuroscience 6 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Psychology 2 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 17 46%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2021.
All research outputs
#14,265,712
of 21,322,016 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Neurophysiology
#2,057
of 3,753 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#176,523
of 290,950 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Neurophysiology
#33
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,322,016 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,753 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,950 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.