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Induction of Vertebrate Regeneration by a Transient Sodium Current

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroscience, September 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
7 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
135 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
134 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Induction of Vertebrate Regeneration by a Transient Sodium Current
Published in
Journal of Neuroscience, September 2010
DOI 10.1523/jneurosci.3315-10.2010
Pubmed ID
Authors

A.-S. Tseng, W. S. Beane, J. M. Lemire, A. Masi, M. Levin

Abstract

Amphibians such as frogs can restore lost organs during development, including the lens and tail. To design biomedical therapies for organ repair, it is necessary to develop a detailed understanding of natural regeneration. Recently, ion transport has been implicated as a functional regulator of regeneration. Whereas voltage-gated sodium channels play a well known and important role in propagating action potentials in excitable cells, we have identified a novel role in regeneration for the ion transport function mediated by the voltage-gated sodium channel, Na(V)1.2. A local, early increase in intracellular sodium is required for initiating regeneration following Xenopus laevis tail amputation, and molecular and pharmacological inhibition of sodium transport causes regenerative failure. Na(V)1.2 is absent under nonregenerative conditions, but misexpression of human Na(V)1.5 can rescue regeneration during these states. Remarkably, pharmacological induction of a transient sodium current is capable of restoring regeneration even after the formation of a nonregenerative wound epithelium, confirming that it is the regulation of sodium transport that is critical for regeneration. Our studies reveal a previously undetected competency window in which cells retain their intrinsic regenerative program, identify a novel endogenous role for Na(V) in regeneration, and show that modulation of sodium transport represents an exciting new approach to organ repair.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 134 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Portugal 2 1%
Spain 2 1%
Germany 1 <1%
Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Unknown 122 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 25%
Researcher 24 18%
Student > Master 17 13%
Professor 12 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 11 8%
Other 29 22%
Unknown 8 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 61 46%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 26 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 8%
Neuroscience 7 5%
Computer Science 4 3%
Other 13 10%
Unknown 12 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 November 2019.
All research outputs
#711,688
of 17,359,532 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroscience
#1,445
of 20,990 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,646
of 255,481 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroscience
#28
of 379 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,359,532 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 20,990 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,481 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 379 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.