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Antibiotics as selectors and accelerators of diversity in the mechanisms of resistance: from the resistome to genetic plasticity in the β-lactamases world

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Microbiology, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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145 Mendeley
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Title
Antibiotics as selectors and accelerators of diversity in the mechanisms of resistance: from the resistome to genetic plasticity in the β-lactamases world
Published in
Frontiers in Microbiology, January 2013
DOI 10.3389/fmicb.2013.00009
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juan-Carlos Galán, Fernando González-Candelas, Jean-Marc Rolain, Rafael Cantón

Abstract

Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance determinants, natural molecules closely related to bacterial physiology and consistent with an ancient origin, are not only present in antibiotic-producing bacteria. Throughput sequencing technologies have revealed an unexpected reservoir of antibiotic resistance in the environment. These data suggest that co-evolution between antibiotic and antibiotic resistance genes has occurred since the beginning of time. This evolutionary race has probably been slow because of highly regulated processes and low antibiotic concentrations. Therefore to understand this global problem, a new variable must be introduced, that the antibiotic resistance is a natural event, inherent to life. However, the industrial production of natural and synthetic antibiotics has dramatically accelerated this race, selecting some of the many resistance genes present in nature and contributing to their diversification. One of the best models available to understand the biological impact of selection and diversification are β-lactamases. They constitute the most widespread mechanism of resistance, at least among pathogenic bacteria, with more than 1000 enzymes identified in the literature. In the last years, there has been growing concern about the description, spread, and diversification of β-lactamases with carbapenemase activity and AmpC-type in plasmids. Phylogenies of these enzymes help the understanding of the evolutionary forces driving their selection. Moreover, understanding the adaptive potential of β-lactamases contribute to exploration the evolutionary antagonists trajectories through the design of more efficient synthetic molecules. In this review, we attempt to analyze the antibiotic resistance problem from intrinsic and environmental resistomes to the adaptive potential of resistance genes and the driving forces involved in their diversification, in order to provide a global perspective of the resistance problem.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 145 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 4 3%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Estonia 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 133 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 23%
Student > Master 26 18%
Researcher 24 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 12%
Student > Bachelor 15 10%
Other 30 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 63 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 11%
Unspecified 13 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 7%
Other 23 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2016.
All research outputs
#6,777,866
of 12,506,736 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Microbiology
#4,061
of 9,385 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,348
of 252,109 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Microbiology
#121
of 348 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,506,736 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,385 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,109 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 348 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.