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Hospital preferences of nursing students in Korea: a discrete choice experiment approach

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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9 Mendeley
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Title
Hospital preferences of nursing students in Korea: a discrete choice experiment approach
Published in
Human Resources for Health, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12960-016-0156-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bo-hyun Park, YuKyung Ko

Abstract

DCE was applied to investigate nursing students' preferred hospital choice criteria and to investigate the trends in the trade-offs by calculating the marginal rate of substitution between these criteria. This study identified the properties of the hospitals primarily selected by nursing students, and aims to estimate the monetary value of each attribute. Based on discussions and in-depth interviews with nursing students' focus groups and a literature review, we created a discrete choice experiment (DCE) that assessed how students' stated preference for a certain hospital choice was influenced by various job attributes: higher salary, location, hospital type, salary per year, provision of a dormitory, etc. We applied this DCE to nursing students in South Korea using a brief structured questionnaire, and we used conditional logit models to estimate the utility of each job's attributes. Willingness to pay (WTP) was estimated as the ratio of the value of the coefficient of interest to the negative of the cost attribute. Complete data for the DCE analysis were available for 702 nursing students. In the main effect mixed logit model, the welfare system and organizational culture were most strongly associated with job preference. Location, hospital type, and opportunity to upgrade qualifications had a negative influence on hospital choice. The WTP threshold was 7,043,000 KRW for the welfare system and 9,928,000 KRW for the organizational culture (relation-oriented). Better nursing working conditions, such as a positive organizational culture and the provision of a welfare system, can improve the motivation and applications for hospitals in rural areas.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 22%
Researcher 1 11%
Professor 1 11%
Unknown 2 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 3 33%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 22%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 11%
Social Sciences 1 11%
Unknown 2 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,583,445
of 8,477,503 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#425
of 559 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,644
of 253,154 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#17
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,477,503 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 559 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,154 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.