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The acceptability of mass administrations of anti-malarial drugs as part of targeted malaria elimination in villages along the Thai–Myanmar border

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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34 Dimensions

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60 Mendeley
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Title
The acceptability of mass administrations of anti-malarial drugs as part of targeted malaria elimination in villages along the Thai–Myanmar border
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1528-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ladda Kajeechiwa, May Myo Thwin, Paw Wah Shee, Nan Lin Yee, Elvina, Peapah, Kyawt, Poe Thit Oo, William PoWah, Jacqueline Roger Min, Jacher Wiladphaingern, Lorenz von Seidlein, Suphak Nosten, Francois Nosten

Abstract

A targeted malaria elimination project, including mass drug administrations (MDA) of dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine plus a single low dose primaquine is underway in villages along the Thailand Myanmar border. The intervention has multiple components but the success of the project will depend on the participation of the entire communities. Quantitative surveys were conducted to study reasons for participation or non-participation in the campaign with the aim to identify factors associated with the acceptance and participation in the mass drug administrations. The household heads in four study villages in which MDAs had taken place previously were interviewed between January 2014 and July 2015. 174/378 respondents (46 %) completed three rounds of three drug doses each, 313/378 (83 %) took at least three consecutive doses and 56/378 (15 %) did not participate at all in the MDA. The respondents from the two villages (KNH and TPN) were much more likely to participate in the MDA than respondents from the other two villages (HKT and TOT). The more compliant villages KNH and TPN had both an appearance of cohesive communities with similar demographic and ethnic backgrounds. By contrast the villages with low participation were unique. One village was fragmented following years of armed conflict and many respondents gave little inclination to cooperate with outsiders. The other village with low MDA coverage was characterised by a high percentage of short-term residents with little interest in community interventions. A universal reason for non-participation in the MDA applicable to all villages was an inadequate understanding of the intervention. It is unlikely that community engagement can unite fragmented communities in participating in an intervention, which benefits the community. Understanding the purpose and the reasons underlying the intervention is an important pre-condition for participation. In the absence of direct benefits and a complete understanding of the indirect benefits trust in the investigators is critical for participation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 60 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 12%
Student > Master 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Other 4 7%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 12 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 42%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 20 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2017.
All research outputs
#3,111,686
of 15,918,484 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#906
of 4,496 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,576
of 270,539 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,918,484 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,496 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,539 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them