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Skin metastases of cervical cancer: two case reports and review of the literature

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Case Reports, September 2016
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Title
Skin metastases of cervical cancer: two case reports and review of the literature
Published in
Journal of Medical Case Reports, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13256-016-1042-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Meryem Benoulaid, Hanan Elkacemi, Imane Bourhafour, Jihane Khalil, Sanaa Elmajjaoui, Basma Khannoussi, Tayeb Kebdani, Noureddine Benjaafar

Abstract

Although cervix carcinoma is one of the most common malignancies in women, hematogenous metastases are relatively not common. Cutaneous metastases, in particular, are unusual even at an advanced stage of disease. Their presence is a predictor of poor prognosis. Case 1: A 63-year-old postmenopausal Moroccan woman was diagnosed as having cervical squamous cell carcinoma. She was treated with radical concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy followed by low-dose brachytherapy. Six months after finishing the therapy, multiple skin nodules appeared on her abdomen and chest wall. An excision biopsy was performed and showed metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. Her disease progressed and she died before completing her fourth course of palliative chemotherapy. Case 2: A 48-year-old Moroccan woman was diagnosed as having cervical squamous cell carcinoma; she was treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Before a planned high-dose brachytherapy, she noticed many nodular lesions on her arms, thighs, and chest wall. An excision biopsy was performed and showed metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. She then underwent a series of imaging examinations, including computed tomography of her chest, abdomen, and pelvis, and a whole body bone scan that showed disseminated disease involving her lungs and bones. She died after two courses of palliative chemotherapy, 2 months after the appearance of the skin lesions. We report two cases to illustrate a rare localization of metastasis from cervical carcinoma that is highly aggressive requiring early detection and aggressive management.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 23%
Researcher 3 23%
Student > Bachelor 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 15%
Student > Master 2 15%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 31%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2016.
All research outputs
#9,071,167
of 11,329,665 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#935
of 1,684 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#181,722
of 259,296 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#42
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,329,665 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,684 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.