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Perceiving invisible light through a somatosensory cortical prosthesis

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, February 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
twitter
124 tweeters
facebook
12 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
283 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Perceiving invisible light through a somatosensory cortical prosthesis
Published in
Nature Communications, February 2013
DOI 10.1038/ncomms2497
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric E. Thomson, Rafael Carra, Miguel A.L. Nicolelis

Abstract

Sensory neuroprostheses show great potential for alleviating major sensory deficits. It is not known, however, whether such devices can augment the subject's normal perceptual range. Here we show that adult rats can learn to perceive otherwise invisible infrared light through a neuroprosthesis that couples the output of a head-mounted infrared sensor to their somatosensory cortex (S1) via intracortical microstimulation. Rats readily learn to use this new information source, and generate active exploratory strategies to discriminate among infrared signals in their environment. S1 neurons in these infrared-perceiving rats respond to both whisker deflection and intracortical microstimulation, suggesting that the infrared representation does not displace the original tactile representation. Hence, sensory cortical prostheses, in addition to restoring normal neurological functions, may serve to expand natural perceptual capabilities in mammals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 124 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 283 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 20 7%
Japan 3 1%
United Kingdom 3 1%
Germany 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Sweden 2 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Other 8 3%
Unknown 238 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 95 34%
Researcher 57 20%
Student > Master 35 12%
Student > Bachelor 26 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 20 7%
Other 41 14%
Unknown 9 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 77 27%
Engineering 59 21%
Neuroscience 49 17%
Psychology 28 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 5%
Other 34 12%
Unknown 22 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 268. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 May 2020.
All research outputs
#60,050
of 15,606,530 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#816
of 29,640 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#579
of 253,849 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,606,530 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 29,640 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 48.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,849 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them