↓ Skip to main content

Organization of olfactory centres in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, October 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
36 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
65 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
12 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
76 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
177 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Organization of olfactory centres in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae
Published in
Nature Communications, October 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms13010
Pubmed ID
Authors

Olena Riabinina, Darya Task, Elizabeth Marr, Chun-Chieh Lin, Robert Alford, David A. O'Brochta, Christopher J. Potter

Abstract

Mosquitoes are vectors for multiple infectious human diseases and use a variety of sensory cues (olfactory, temperature, humidity and visual) to locate a human host. A comprehensive understanding of the circuitry underlying sensory signalling in the mosquito brain is lacking. Here we used the Q-system of binary gene expression to develop transgenic lines of Anopheles gambiae in which olfactory receptor neurons expressing the odorant receptor co-receptor (Orco) gene are labelled with GFP. These neurons project from the antennae and maxillary palps to the antennal lobe (AL) and from the labella on the proboscis to the suboesophageal zone (SEZ), suggesting integration of olfactory and gustatory signals occurs in this brain region. We present detailed anatomical maps of olfactory innervations in the AL and the SEZ, identifying glomeruli that may respond to human body odours or carbon dioxide. Our results pave the way for anatomical and functional neurogenetic studies of sensory processing in mosquitoes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 65 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 177 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 175 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 47 27%
Researcher 33 19%
Student > Master 23 13%
Student > Bachelor 20 11%
Student > Postgraduate 9 5%
Other 25 14%
Unknown 20 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 69 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 30 17%
Neuroscience 29 16%
Environmental Science 4 2%
Physics and Astronomy 3 2%
Other 15 8%
Unknown 27 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 335. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2020.
All research outputs
#58,545
of 18,846,097 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#817
of 37,299 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,805
of 279,481 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#32
of 917 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,846,097 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 37,299 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 53.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,481 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 917 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.