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Cancer Epidemiology in Hispanic Populations: What Have We Learned and Where Do We Need to Make Progress?

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, March 2022
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

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Title
Cancer Epidemiology in Hispanic Populations: What Have We Learned and Where Do We Need to Make Progress?
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, March 2022
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-21-1303
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura Fejerman, Amelie G. Ramirez, Anna María Nápoles, Scarlett Lin Gomez, Mariana C. Stern

Abstract

The Hispanic/Latino(x) population (H/Ls) in the United States of America is heterogenous and fast-growing. Cancer is the number one cause of death among H/Ls, accounting for 21% of deaths. Whereas for the most common cancers incidence rates are lower in H/Ls compared with non-H/L White (NHW) individuals, H/Ls have a higher incidence of liver, stomach, cervical, penile and gallbladder cancers. H/L patients tend to be diagnosed at more advanced stages for breast, colorectal, prostate and lung cancers, and melanoma compared to NHW individuals. Etiological and cancer outcomes research among H/Ls lags other populations. In this review, we provide a summary of challenges, opportunities and research priorities related to cancer etiology, cancer outcomes, and survivorship to make progress in addressing scientific gaps. Briefly, we prioritize the need for more research on determinants of obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its progression to liver cancer, stomach and gallbladder cancer, and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We emphasize the need to improve cancer screening, early detection of cancer, and survivorship care. We highlight critical resources needed to make progress in cancer epidemiological studies among H/L populations, including the importance of training the next generation of cancer epidemiologists conducting research in H/Ls.

Twitter Demographics

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Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2022.
All research outputs
#1,772,966
of 21,229,756 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#583
of 4,305 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,162
of 333,326 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#7
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,229,756 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,305 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 333,326 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.