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Malaria infection and anaemia in HIV-infected children in Mutengene, Southwest Cameroon: a cross sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Malaria infection and anaemia in HIV-infected children in Mutengene, Southwest Cameroon: a cross sectional study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1853-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ayukenchengamba Bate, Helen K. Kimbi, Emmaculate Lum, Leopold G. Lehman, Elias F. Onyoh, Lucy M. Ndip, Conica M. Njabi, Calvin Tonga, Godlove B.Wempnje, Roland N. Ndip, Pascal O. Bessong

Abstract

Malaria is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in children and HIV infection as well as other factors may worsen the situation. This study was aimed at determining the factors influencing malaria parasite prevalence and density as well as anaemia in HIV-infected children in Mutengene, Cameroon from November, 2012 to April, 2013. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to record information on socio-demographic factors and use of preventive measures by caregivers of HIV-infected children aged 1-15 years and of both sexes. Venous blood was collected; blood films were prepared and Giemsa-stained for parasite detection and speciation. Haemoglobin concentration was measured and the anaemic status determined. Data was analysed using Epi Info 7 software. A total of 234 children were studied. The overall malaria parasite prevalence was 24.8 % (58) and was significantly higher (31.9 %, P = 0 .004) in females, those who did not implement any preventive measure at all (66.7 %, P = 0.03) and children who used antiretroviral therapy (ART) (28.6 %, P = 0.02) when compared with their respective counterparts. Geometric mean parasite density (GMPD) was significantly higher (3098.4, P = 0.02) in children who presented with fever, had CD4 T cells ≥500 cells/μL (491.3, P = 0.003) and those with moderate anaemia (1658.8, P = 0.03) than their respective counterparts. Although there was no significant difference, GMPD was however higher in males (549.0); those not on ART (635.0) and highest in children <5 years old (633.0) than their respective counterparts. The overall prevalence of anaemia was 49.6 % (116). The value was significantly highest (58.3 %, P = 0.01) in the 11-15 years age group; those with CD4 T cell level 200-499 (72.7 %, P = 0.001) and children with fever (85.7 %, P = 0.01). Implementation of proper and integrated malaria preventive measures as well as frequent monitoring of anaemia on prescription of ART could likely improve the health conditions of HIV-infected children thus avoiding malaria-related morbidity and mortality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 29%
Student > Bachelor 6 19%
Student > Master 6 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 13%
Social Sciences 3 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 10%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 October 2016.
All research outputs
#7,516,636
of 13,946,582 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,005
of 5,205 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,804
of 267,345 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,946,582 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,205 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,345 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them