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Truncating Prolactin Receptor Mutations Promote Tumor Growth in Murine Estrogen Receptor-Alpha Mammary Carcinomas.

Overview of attention for article published in Cell Reports, September 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
13 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
9 Mendeley
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Title
Truncating Prolactin Receptor Mutations Promote Tumor Growth in Murine Estrogen Receptor-Alpha Mammary Carcinomas.
Published in
Cell Reports, September 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.08.076
Pubmed ID
Authors

Griffith, Obi L, Chan, Szeman Ruby, Griffith, Malachi, Krysiak, Kilannin, Skidmore, Zachary L, Hundal, Jasreet, Allen, Julie A, Arthur, Cora D, Runci, Daniele, Bugatti, Mattia, Miceli, Alexander P, Schmidt, Heather, Trani, Lee, Kanchi, Krishna-Latha, Miller, Christopher A, Larson, David E, Fulton, Robert S, Vermi, William, Wilson, Richard K, Schreiber, Robert D, Mardis, Elaine R

Abstract

Estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ERα+) luminal tumors are the most frequent subtype of breast cancer. Stat1(-/-) mice develop mammary tumors that closely recapitulate the biological characteristics of this cancer subtype. To identify transforming events that contribute to tumorigenesis, we performed whole genome sequencing of Stat1(-/-) primary mammary tumors and matched normal tissues. This investigation identified somatic truncating mutations affecting the prolactin receptor (PRLR) in all tumor and no normal samples. Targeted sequencing confirmed the presence of these mutations in precancerous lesions, indicating that this is an early event in tumorigenesis. Functional evaluation of these heterozygous mutations in Stat1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed that co-expression of truncated and wild-type PRLR led to aberrant STAT3 and STAT5 activation downstream of the receptor, cellular transformation in vitro, and tumor formation in vivo. In conclusion, truncating mutations of PRLR promote tumor growth in a model of human ERα+ breast cancer and warrant further investigation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 11%
Unknown 8 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 33%
Student > Bachelor 2 22%
Other 1 11%
Student > Master 1 11%
Student > Postgraduate 1 11%
Other 1 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 56%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 33%
Social Sciences 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2016.
All research outputs
#1,353,234
of 8,547,393 outputs
Outputs from Cell Reports
#1,888
of 4,082 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,068
of 254,089 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell Reports
#152
of 282 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,547,393 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,082 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,089 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 282 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.