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Pacific and Atlantic Ocean influences on multidecadal drought frequency in the United States

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, March 2004
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
3 blogs
policy
3 policy sources
twitter
19 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
693 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
401 Mendeley
Title
Pacific and Atlantic Ocean influences on multidecadal drought frequency in the United States
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, March 2004
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0306738101
Pubmed ID
Authors

G. J. McCabe, M. A. Palecki, J. L. Betancourt

Abstract

More than half (52%) of the spatial and temporal variance in multidecadal drought frequency over the conterminous United States is attributable to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). An additional 22% of the variance in drought frequency is related to a complex spatial pattern of positive and negative trends in drought occurrence possibly related to increasing Northern Hemisphere temperatures or some other unidirectional climate trend. Recent droughts with broad impacts over the conterminous U.S. (1996, 1999-2002) were associated with North Atlantic warming (positive AMO) and northeastern and tropical Pacific cooling (negative PDO). Much of the long-term predictability of drought frequency may reside in the multidecadal behavior of the North Atlantic Ocean. Should the current positive AMO (warm North Atlantic) conditions persist into the upcoming decade, we suggest two possible drought scenarios that resemble the continental-scale patterns of the 1930s (positive PDO) and 1950s (negative PDO) drought.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 401 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 27 7%
Argentina 3 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Other 4 <1%
Unknown 356 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 108 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 104 26%
Student > Master 37 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 30 7%
Unspecified 26 6%
Other 95 24%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 177 44%
Environmental Science 82 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 53 13%
Unspecified 41 10%
Engineering 27 7%
Other 20 5%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 54. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 May 2019.
All research outputs
#316,147
of 13,429,053 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#6,867
of 80,189 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#306,981
of 12,769,913 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#6,837
of 79,961 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,429,053 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 80,189 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 12,769,913 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 79,961 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.