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Variation in Migratory Behavior Influences Regional Genetic Diversity and Structure among American Kestrel Populations (Falco sparverius) in North America

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Heredity, May 2012
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Title
Variation in Migratory Behavior Influences Regional Genetic Diversity and Structure among American Kestrel Populations (Falco sparverius) in North America
Published in
Journal of Heredity, May 2012
DOI 10.1093/jhered/ess024
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark P. Miller, Thomas D. Mullins, John W. Parrish, Jeffrey R. Walters, Susan M. Haig

Abstract

Birds employ numerous strategies to cope with seasonal fluctuations in high-quality habitat availability. Long distance migration is a common tactic; however, partial migration is especially common among broadly distributed species. Under partial migration systems, a portion of a species migrates, whereas the remainder inhabits breeding grounds year round. In this study, we identified effects of migratory behavior variation on genetic structure and diversity of American Kestrels (Falco sparverius), a widespread partial migrant in North America. American Kestrels generally migrate; however, a resident group inhabits the southeastern United States year round. The southeastern group is designated as a separate subspecies (F. s. paulus) from the migratory group (F. s. sparverius). Using mitochondrial DNA and microsatellites from 183 and 211 individuals, respectively, we illustrate that genetic structure is stronger among nonmigratory populations, with differentiation measures ranging from 0.060 to 0.189 depending on genetic marker and analysis approach. In contrast, measures from western North American populations ranged from 0 to 0.032. These findings suggest that seasonal migratory behavior is also associated with natal and breeding dispersal tendencies. We likewise detected significantly lower genetic diversity within nonmigratory populations, reflecting the greater influence of genetic drift in small populations. We identified the signal of population expansion among nonmigratory populations, consistent with the recent establishment of higher latitude breeding locations following Pleistocene glacial retreat. Differentiation of F. s. paulus and F. s. sparverius reflected subtle differences in allele frequencies. Because migratory behavior can evolve quickly, our analyses suggest recent origins of migratory American Kestrel populations in North America.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
United States 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Unknown 83 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 21%
Researcher 11 13%
Other 9 10%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Other 12 14%
Unknown 11 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 63%
Environmental Science 8 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 8%
Unspecified 1 1%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 13 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 February 2013.
All research outputs
#7,517,767
of 12,023,427 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Heredity
#752
of 975 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,237
of 132,581 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Heredity
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,023,427 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 975 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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