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Associations between psychological factors and the effect of home-based physical exercise in women with chronic neck and shoulder pain

Overview of attention for article published in SAGE Open Medicine, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 161)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
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Title
Associations between psychological factors and the effect of home-based physical exercise in women with chronic neck and shoulder pain
Published in
SAGE Open Medicine, October 2016
DOI 10.1177/2050312116668933
Pubmed ID
Authors

Linn Karlsson, Björn Gerdle, Esa-Pekka Takala, Gerhard Andersson, Britt Larsson, Karlsson, Linn, Gerdle, Björn, Takala, Esa-Pekka, Andersson, Gerhard, Larsson, Britt

Abstract

Exercise is often used in the treatment of chronic neck and shoulder muscle pain. It is likely that psychological aspects have an impact on the results of exercise-based treatments. (1) To examine the associations between psychological factors and the effect of a home-based physical exercise intervention. (2) To examine differences in psychological factors at baseline between (a) subjects who continued in the trial and those who did not and (b) subjects who completed the intervention and those who did not. A total of 57 women with chronic neck and shoulder pain were included in a home-based exercise intervention trial. Pain intensity, disability, and psychological factors (anxiety and depression symptoms, catastrophizing, fear-avoidance beliefs, self-efficacy, and pain acceptance) were measured at baseline, after 4-6 months, and after 1 year of exercise. Associations between the psychological factors and changes in pain intensity and disability were analysed, as well as differences in psychological factors at baseline between subjects who continued in and completed the intervention, and those who did not. Associations between positive changes in pain intensity and disability were found for low fear-avoidance beliefs and low-pain self-efficacy at baseline. In addition, fear-avoidance beliefs at baseline were higher in the subjects who dropped out of the intervention than in those who continued. Pain acceptance at baseline was higher in the subjects who completed the intervention at the end of the trial. Particularly, fear-avoidance beliefs and pain self-efficacy should be taken into consideration when implementing home-based physical exercise as treatment for chronic neck pain. In addition, high pain acceptance might improve the adherence to prescribed exercise.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 18%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 18%
Student > Master 2 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 12%
Researcher 2 12%
Other 5 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 29%
Unspecified 4 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 24%
Psychology 2 12%
Sports and Recreations 2 12%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2017.
All research outputs
#1,017,960
of 8,813,074 outputs
Outputs from SAGE Open Medicine
#13
of 161 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,636
of 255,633 outputs
Outputs of similar age from SAGE Open Medicine
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,813,074 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 161 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,633 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them