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Mediating Effect of Changes in Hand Impairments on Hand Function in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis: Exploring the Mechanisms of an Effective Exercise Program

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Care & Research (2151464X), June 2017
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Title
Mediating Effect of Changes in Hand Impairments on Hand Function in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis: Exploring the Mechanisms of an Effective Exercise Program
Published in
Arthritis Care & Research (2151464X), June 2017
DOI 10.1002/acr.23093
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amanda M. Hall, Bethan Copsey, Mark Williams, Cynthia Srikesavan, Sarah E. Lamb

Abstract

To determine whether the effect of the 'Strengthening And stretching for Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Hand' (SARAH) exercise programme on hand function was mediated by changes in the proposed active ingredients: strength, dexterity, and/or range of motion. The SARAH intervention included exercises hypothesized to improve potential mediators of grip strength, pinch strength, wrist flexion, wrist extension, finger flexion, finger extension, thumb opposition, and dexterity, which would theoretically improve self-reported hand function. All variables were measured at baseline and at 4 and 12 months. Structural equation modelling was used to assess mediation on change in hand function via change in potential mediators. Change in grip strength partially mediated change in hand function. Grip strength mediated 19.4% (95% confidence interval: 0.9% to 37.8%) of the treatment effect. Improvements in grip strength at 4 months are likely to mediate improved hand function at 12 months. The role of joint mobility exercises is less clear and is likely influenced by the choice of measurement tools for both mobility and function outcomes. More robust measurements of wrist and hand mobility for patients with rheumatoid arthritis may be necessary to determine the relationship between this variable and self-reported hand function. Using a large trial dataset, we have demonstrated that techniques used to target grip strength are key active ingredients of the SARAH exercise programme and mediate its effect. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 2%
Unknown 40 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 11 27%
Student > Bachelor 8 20%
Student > Master 7 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Other 4 10%
Other 7 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 13 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 24%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Sports and Recreations 2 5%
Other 3 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 October 2016.
All research outputs
#10,757,717
of 13,523,960 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Care & Research (2151464X)
#989
of 1,164 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,929
of 269,282 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Care & Research (2151464X)
#10
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,523,960 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,164 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.8. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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