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Implications of temperature variation for malaria parasite development across Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, February 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
42 X users
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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179 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
373 Mendeley
Title
Implications of temperature variation for malaria parasite development across Africa
Published in
Scientific Reports, February 2013
DOI 10.1038/srep01300
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. I. Blanford, S. Blanford, R. G. Crane, M. E. Mann, K. P. Paaijmans, K. V. Schreiber, M. B. Thomas

Abstract

Temperature is an important determinant of malaria transmission. Recent work has shown that mosquito and parasite biology are influenced not only by average temperature, but also by the extent of the daily temperature variation. Here we examine how parasite development within the mosquito (Extrinsic Incubation Period) is expected to vary over time and space depending on the diurnal temperature range and baseline mean temperature in Kenya and across Africa. Our results show that under cool conditions, the typical approach of using mean monthly temperatures alone to characterize the transmission environment will underestimate parasite development. In contrast, under warmer conditions, the use of mean temperatures will overestimate development. Qualitatively similar patterns hold using both outdoor and indoor temperatures. These findings have important implications for defining malaria risk. Furthermore, understanding the influence of daily temperature dynamics could provide new insights into ectotherm ecology both now and in response to future climate change.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 373 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 5 1%
United States 3 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Ethiopia 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 354 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 75 20%
Researcher 59 16%
Student > Master 59 16%
Student > Bachelor 38 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 4%
Other 52 14%
Unknown 74 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 106 28%
Environmental Science 51 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 39 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 15 4%
Other 63 17%
Unknown 80 21%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 March 2023.
All research outputs
#901,682
of 25,602,335 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#9,526
of 141,999 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,066
of 204,906 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#31
of 479 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,602,335 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 141,999 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 204,906 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 479 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.