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Bleaching susceptibility and mortality of corals are determined by fine-scale differences in symbiont type

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, July 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
2 policy sources
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
200 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
331 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Bleaching susceptibility and mortality of corals are determined by fine-scale differences in symbiont type
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, July 2008
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0708049105
Pubmed ID
Authors

E. M. Sampayo, T. Ridgway, P. Bongaerts, O. Hoegh-Guldberg

Abstract

Coral bleaching has been identified as one of the major contributors to coral reef decline, and the occurrence of different symbionts determined by broad genetic groupings (clades A-H) is commonly used to explain thermal responses of reef-building corals. By using Stylophora pistillata as a model, we monitored individual tagged colonies in situ over a two-year period and show that fine level genetic variability within clade C is correlated to differences in bleaching susceptibility. Based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of the internal transcribed spacer region 2, visual bleaching assessments, symbiont densities, host protein, and pulse amplitude modulated fluorometry, we show that subcladal types C78 and C8/a are more thermally tolerant than C79 and C35/a, which suffered significant bleaching and postbleaching mortality. Although additional symbiont types were detected during bleaching in colonies harboring types C79 and C35/a, all colonies reverted back to their original symbionts postbleaching. Most importantly, the data propose that the differential mortality of hosts harboring thermally sensitive versus resistant symbionts rather than symbiont shuffling/switching within a single host is responsible for the observed symbiont composition changes of coral communities after bleaching. This study therefore highlights that the use of broad cladal designations may not be suitable to describe differences in bleaching susceptibility, and that differential mortality results in a loss of both symbiont and host genetic diversity and therefore represents an important mechanism in explaining how coral reef communities may respond to changing conditions.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 331 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 2%
Mexico 4 1%
Brazil 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Argentina 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
New Zealand 2 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Other 4 1%
Unknown 303 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 77 23%
Researcher 64 19%
Student > Master 60 18%
Student > Bachelor 39 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 20 6%
Other 71 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 210 63%
Environmental Science 55 17%
Unspecified 23 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 13 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 3%
Other 21 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 November 2016.
All research outputs
#918,224
of 12,364,927 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#14,813
of 77,321 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,847
of 143,005 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#329
of 1,000 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,364,927 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,321 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 143,005 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,000 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.