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Macroscopic, Histologic, and Ultrastructural Lesions Associated With Avian Keratin Disorder in Black-Capped Chickadees ( Poecile atricapillus )

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Pathology, February 2013
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Title
Macroscopic, Histologic, and Ultrastructural Lesions Associated With Avian Keratin Disorder in Black-Capped Chickadees ( Poecile atricapillus )
Published in
Veterinary Pathology, February 2013
DOI 10.1177/0300985812469637
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. Van Hemert, A. G. Armién, J. E. Blake, C. M. Handel, T. M. O’Hara

Abstract

An epizootic of beak abnormalities (avian keratin disorder) was recently detected among wild birds in Alaska. Here we describe the gross, histologic, and ultrastructural features of the disease in 30 affected adult black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus). Grossly, there was elongation of the rhamphotheca, with varying degrees of lateral deviation, crossing, and gapping between the upper and lower beak. Not uncommonly, the claws were overgrown, and there was alopecia, scaling, and crusting of the skin. The most prominent histopathologic features in the beak included epidermal hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and core-like intrusions of necrotic debris. In affected birds, particularly those with moderate to severe beak overgrowth, there was remodeling of premaxillary and mandibular bones and various dermal lesions. Lesions analogous to those found in beaks were present in affected claws, indicating that this disorder may target both of these similar tissues. Mild to moderate hyperkeratosis occurred in other keratinized tissues, including skin, feather follicles, and, occasionally, sinus epithelium, but typically only in the presence of microbes. We did not find consistent evidence of a bacterial, fungal, or viral etiology for the beak lesions. The changes observed in affected birds did not correspond with any known avian diseases, suggesting a potentially novel hyperkeratotic disorder in wild birds.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 33 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 22%
Other 5 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Student > Postgraduate 5 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 28%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 19%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Chemistry 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 February 2013.
All research outputs
#11,105,646
of 12,488,291 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Pathology
#1,007
of 1,192 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,845
of 141,463 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Pathology
#10
of 12 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,192 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.