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Predictors of homelessness among vulnerably housed adults in 3 Canadian cities: a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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56 Mendeley
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Title
Predictors of homelessness among vulnerably housed adults in 3 Canadian cities: a prospective cohort study
Published in
BMC Public Health, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3711-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew J. To, Anita Palepu, Tim Aubry, Rosane Nisenbaum, Evie Gogosis, Anne Gadermann, Rebecca Cherner, Susan Farrell, Vachan Misir, Stephen W. Hwang

Abstract

Homelessness is a major concern in many urban communities across North America. Since vulnerably housed individuals are at risk of experiencing homelessness, it is important to identify predictive factors linked to subsequent homelessness in this population. The objectives of this study were to determine the probability of experiencing homelessness among vulnerably housed adults over three years and factors associated with higher risk of homelessness. Vulnerably housed adults were recruited in three Canadian cities. Data on demographic characteristics, chronic health conditions, and drug use problems were collected through structured interviews. Housing history was obtained at baseline and annual follow-up interviews. Generalized estimating equations were used to characterize associations between candidate predictors and subsequent experiences of homelessness during each follow-up year. Among 561 participants, the prevalence of homelessness was 29.2 % over three years. Male gender (AOR = 1.59, 95 % CI: 1.14-2.21) and severe drug use problems (AOR = 1.98, 95 % CI: 1.22-3.20) were independently associated with experiencing homelessness during the follow-up period. Having ≥3 chronic conditions (AOR = 0.55, 95 % CI: 0.33-0.94) and reporting higher housing quality (AOR = 0.99, 95 % CI: 0.97-1.00) were protective against homelessness. Vulnerably housed individuals are at high risk for experiencing homelessness. The study has public health implications, highlighting the need for enhanced access to addiction treatment and improved housing quality for this population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 20%
Student > Bachelor 10 18%
Researcher 6 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 5%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 11 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 12 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 20%
Social Sciences 9 16%
Arts and Humanities 2 4%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 14 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 June 2017.
All research outputs
#2,666,323
of 11,251,036 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,918
of 7,716 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,623
of 259,767 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#88
of 238 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,251,036 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,716 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,767 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 238 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.