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Are the small human-like fossils found on Flores human endemic cretins?

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
18 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
59 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
124 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Are the small human-like fossils found on Flores human endemic cretins?
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2008
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2007.1488
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter J Obendorf, Charles E Oxnard, Ben J Kefford

Abstract

Fossils from Liang Bua (LB) on Flores, Indonesia, including a nearly complete skeleton (LB1) dated to 18kyr BP, were assigned to a new species, Homo floresiensis. We hypothesize that these individuals are myxoedematous endemic (ME) cretins, part of an inland population of (mostly unaffected) Homo sapiens. ME cretins are born without a functioning thyroid; their congenital hypothyroidism leads to severe dwarfism and reduced brain size, but less severe mental retardation and motor disability than neurological endemic cretins. We show that the fossils display many signs of congenital hypothyroidism, including enlarged pituitary fossa, and that distinctive primitive features of LB1 such as the double rooted lower premolar and the primitive wrist morphology are consistent with the hypothesis. We find that the null hypothesis (that LB1 is not a cretin) is rejected by the pituitary fossa size of LB1, and by multivariate analyses of cranial measures. We show that critical environmental factors were potentially present on Flores, how remains of cretins but not of unaffected individuals could be preserved in caves, and that extant oral traditions may provide a record of cretinism.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 124 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 5%
Germany 2 2%
Canada 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Romania 1 <1%
Thailand 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 108 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 24%
Researcher 26 21%
Student > Master 13 10%
Student > Postgraduate 8 6%
Student > Bachelor 8 6%
Other 30 24%
Unknown 9 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 53 43%
Arts and Humanities 19 15%
Social Sciences 15 12%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Other 15 12%
Unknown 11 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 201. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2019.
All research outputs
#69,480
of 13,941,062 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#183
of 7,699 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,718
of 13,219,603 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#183
of 7,696 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,941,062 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,699 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 13,219,603 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7,696 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.