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Anthropogenic transport of species across native ranges: unpredictable genetic and evolutionary consequences

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Letters, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
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Title
Anthropogenic transport of species across native ranges: unpredictable genetic and evolutionary consequences
Published in
Biology Letters, October 2016
DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0620
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jamie Hudson, Frédérique Viard, Charlotte Roby, Marc Rius

Abstract

Human activities are responsible for the translocation of vast amounts of organisms, altering natural patterns of dispersal and gene flow. Most research to date has focused on the consequences of anthropogenic transportation of non-indigenous species within introduced ranges, with little research focusing on native species. Here, we compared genetic patterns of the sessile marine invertebrate, Ciona intestinalis, which has highly restricted dispersal capabilities. We collected individuals in a region of the species' native range where human activities that are known to facilitate the artificial spread of species are prevalent. Using microsatellite markers, we revealed highly dissimilar outcomes. First, we found low levels of genetic differentiation among sites separated by both short and large geographical distances, indicating the presence of anthropogenic transport of genotypes, and little influence of natural geographical barriers. Second, we found significant genetic differentiation in pairwise comparisons among certain sites, suggesting that other factors besides artificial transport (e.g. natural dispersal, premodern population structure) may be shaping genetic patterns. Taken together, we found dissimilar patterns of population structure in a highly urbanized region that could not be predicted by artificial transport alone. We conclude that anthropogenic activities alter genetic composition of native ranges, with unknown consequences for species' evolutionary trajectories.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Czechia 1 3%
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 30 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 34%
Researcher 6 19%
Professor 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 53%
Environmental Science 7 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Unknown 7 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 78. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 December 2016.
All research outputs
#284,811
of 15,913,941 outputs
Outputs from Biology Letters
#374
of 2,772 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,941
of 272,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Letters
#17
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,913,941 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,772 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 46.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,359 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.