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Successful treatment of gemcitabine-induced acute interstitial pneumonia with imatinib mesylate: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, October 2016
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Title
Successful treatment of gemcitabine-induced acute interstitial pneumonia with imatinib mesylate: a case report
Published in
BMC Cancer, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2833-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elisabetta Fenocchio, Ilaria Depetris, Delia Campanella, Lucia Garetto, Fabrizio Carnevale Schianca, Danilo Galizia, Giovanni Grignani, Massimo Aglietta, Francesco Leone

Abstract

Gemcitabine is currently the standard chemotherapy for the adjuvant treatment of pancreatic cancer. This chemotherapeutic agent is generally well-tolerated, myelosuppression and gastrointestinal toxicity being common side effects. Nevertheless, gemcitabine-induced pulmonary toxicity has been rarely reported. Despite its low incidence, the spectrum of pulmonary injury is wide, including potentially fatal conditions. We report a case of acute interstitial pneumonia related to gemcitabine, completely solved with Imatinib Mesylate (IM). The patient was a 69-year-old man, who developed a hypoxemic respiratory distress during adjuvant treatment with gemcitabine for stage IIA pancreatic cancer. The nonspecific diffuse alveolar involvement found on computed tomography (CT), together with the negative tests for infectious aetiology and the continuing severe respiratory failure despite a long course of broad-spectrum therapy, suggested gemcitabine-induced acute pneumonia as the most likely diagnosis. Thus, after the failure of steroids and all other conventional therapies, the patient was treated with imatinib mesylate on the basis of its activity in the management of graft-versus-host-induced lung fibrosis. A follow-up CT scan of chest one month later showed complete resolution of pneumonia. Despite the low frequency of serious pulmonary toxicity, gemcitabine widespread use warns clinicians to consider this life-threatening toxicity. The favourable clinical outcome with IM treatment was remarkable, warranting additional study of IM in the treatment of lung fibrosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 25%
Student > Postgraduate 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Student > Master 1 8%
Other 2 17%
Unknown 2 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 50%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 8%
Social Sciences 1 8%
Psychology 1 8%
Unknown 3 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2016.
All research outputs
#7,351,771
of 8,508,684 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,843
of 3,547 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#206,548
of 252,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#88
of 132 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 132 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.