↓ Skip to main content

Assessing potential health risks to fish and humans using mercury concentrations in inland fish from across western Canada and the United States

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, November 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
Title
Assessing potential health risks to fish and humans using mercury concentrations in inland fish from across western Canada and the United States
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, November 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.03.031
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jesse M. Lepak, Mevin B. Hooten, Collin A. Eagles-Smith, Michael T. Tate, Michelle A. Lutz, Joshua T. Ackerman, James J. Willacker, Allyson K. Jackson, David C. Evers, James G. Wiener, Colleen Flanagan Pritz, Jay Davis

Abstract

Fish represent high quality protein and nutrient sources, but Hg contamination is ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems and can pose health risks to fish and their consumers. Potential health risks posed to fish and humans by Hg contamination in fish were assessed in western Canada and the United States. A large compilation of inland fish Hg concentrations was evaluated in terms of potential health risk to the fish themselves, health risk to predatory fish that consume Hg contaminated fish, and to humans that consume Hg contaminated fish. The probability that a fish collected from a given location would exceed a Hg concentration benchmark relevant to a health risk was calculated. These exceedance probabilities and their associated uncertainties were characterized for fish of multiple size classes at multiple health-relevant benchmarks. The approach was novel and allowed for the assessment of the potential for deleterious health effects in fish and humans associated with Hg contamination in fish across this broad study area. Exceedance probabilities were relatively common at low Hg concentration benchmarks, particularly for fish in larger size classes. Specifically, median exceedances for the largest size classes of fish evaluated at the lowest Hg concentration benchmarks were 0.73 (potential health risks to fish themselves), 0.90 (potential health risk to predatory fish that consume Hg contaminated fish), and 0.97 (potential for restricted fish consumption by humans), but diminished to essentially zero at the highest benchmarks and smallest fish size classes. Exceedances of benchmarks are likely to have deleterious health effects on fish and limit recommended amounts of fish humans consume in western Canada and the United States. Results presented here are not intended to subvert or replace local fish Hg data or consumption advice, but provide a basis for identifying areas of potential health risk and developing more focused future research and monitoring efforts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Poland 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 22%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 10 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 25%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 6%
Chemical Engineering 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 7 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2017.
All research outputs
#7,053,061
of 12,269,384 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#4,881
of 8,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#125,782
of 264,314 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#168
of 332 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,269,384 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,421 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,314 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 332 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.