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Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, October 2016
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1 tweeter
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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56 Dimensions

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99 Mendeley
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Title
Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols
Published in
Scientific Reports, October 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep35038
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ivan Kourtchev, Chiara Giorio, Antti Manninen, Eoin Wilson, Brendan Mahon, Juho Aalto, Maija Kajos, Dean Venables, Taina Ruuskanen, Janne Levula, Matti Loponen, Sarah Connors, Neil Harris, Defeng Zhao, Astrid Kiendler-Scharr, Thomas Mentel, Yinon Rudich, Mattias Hallquist, Jean-Francois Doussin, Willy Maenhaut, Jaana Bäck, Tuukka Petäjä, John Wenger, Markku Kulmala, Markus Kalberer

Abstract

Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Singapore 1 1%
Unknown 97 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 26%
Researcher 20 20%
Student > Master 13 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 16 16%
Unknown 12 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 30 30%
Environmental Science 17 17%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 12 12%
Engineering 4 4%
Physics and Astronomy 4 4%
Other 11 11%
Unknown 21 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 December 2017.
All research outputs
#7,707,752
of 12,330,736 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#32,176
of 55,226 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,176
of 265,069 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1,984
of 3,204 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,330,736 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 55,226 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,069 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,204 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.