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Phylogeography of the antilopine wallaroo ( Macropus antilopinus ) across tropical northern Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, October 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

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12 tweeters
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1 Facebook page
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2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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16 Mendeley
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Title
Phylogeography of the antilopine wallaroo ( Macropus antilopinus ) across tropical northern Australia
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, October 2016
DOI 10.1002/ece3.2381
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica J. Wadley, Damien A. Fordham, Vicki A. Thomson, Euan G. Ritchie, Jeremy J. Austin

Abstract

The distribution of antilopine wallaroo, Macropus antilopinus, is marked by a break in the species' range between Queensland and the Northern Territory, coinciding with the Carpentarian barrier. Previous work on M. antilopinus revealed limited genetic differentiation between the Northern Territory and Queensland M. antilopinus populations across this barrier. The study also identified a number of divergent lineages in the Northern Territory, but was unable to elucidate any geographic structure. Here, we re-examine these results to (1) determine phylogeographic patterns across the range of M. antilopinus and (2) infer the biogeographic barriers associated with these patterns. The tropical savannahs of northern Australia: from the Cape York Peninsula in the east, to the Kimberley in the west. We examined phylogeographic patterns in M. antilopinus using a larger number of samples and three mtDNA genes: NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2, cytochrome b, and the control region. Two datasets were generated and analyzed: (1) a subset of samples with all three mtDNA regions concatenated together and (2) all samples for just control region sequences that included samples from the previous study. Analysis included generating phylogenetic trees based on Bayesian analysis and intraspecific median-joining networks. The contemporary spatial structure of M. antilopinus mtDNA lineages revealed five shallow clades and a sixth, divergent lineage. The genetic differences that we found between Queensland and Northern Territory M. antilopinus samples confirmed the split in the geographic distribution of the species. We also found weak genetic differentiation between Northern Territory samples and those from the Kimberley region of Western Australia, possibly due to the Kimberley Plateau-Arnhem Land barrier. Within the Northern Territory, two clades appear to be parapatric in the west, while another two clades are broadly sympatric across the Northern Territory. MtDNA diversity of M. antilopinus revealed an unexpectedly complex evolutionary history involving multiple sympatric and parapatric mtDNA clades across northern Australia. These phylogeographic patterns highlight the importance of investigating genetic variation across distributions of species and integrating this information into biodiversity conservation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 38%
Student > Master 4 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Other 1 6%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 31%
Environmental Science 3 19%
Unknown 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2022.
All research outputs
#3,031,432
of 22,461,871 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#1,798
of 7,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,397
of 295,366 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#32
of 149 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,461,871 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,304 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,366 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 149 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.