The Relationship of Sugar to Population-Level Diabetes Prevalence: An Econometric Analysis of Repeated Cross-Sectional Data

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, January 2013
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

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299 Mendeley
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Title
The Relationship of Sugar to Population-Level Diabetes Prevalence: An Econometric Analysis of Repeated Cross-Sectional Data
Published in
PLoS ONE, January 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0057873
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sanjay Basu, Paula Yoffe, Nancy Hills, Robert H. Lustig, Basu S, Yoffe P, Hills N, Lustig RH

Abstract

While experimental and observational studies suggest that sugar intake is associated with the development of type 2 diabetes, independent of its role in obesity, it is unclear whether alterations in sugar intake can account for differences in diabetes prevalence among overall populations. Using econometric models of repeated cross-sectional data on diabetes and nutritional components of food from 175 countries, we found that every 150 kcal/person/day increase in sugar availability (about one can of soda/day) was associated with increased diabetes prevalence by 1.1% (p <0.001) after testing for potential selection biases and controlling for other food types (including fibers, meats, fruits, oils, cereals), total calories, overweight and obesity, period-effects, and several socioeconomic variables such as aging, urbanization and income. No other food types yielded significant individual associations with diabetes prevalence after controlling for obesity and other confounders. The impact of sugar on diabetes was independent of sedentary behavior and alcohol use, and the effect was modified but not confounded by obesity or overweight. Duration and degree of sugar exposure correlated significantly with diabetes prevalence in a dose-dependent manner, while declines in sugar exposure correlated with significant subsequent declines in diabetes rates independently of other socioeconomic, dietary and obesity prevalence changes. Differences in sugar availability statistically explain variations in diabetes prevalence rates at a population level that are not explained by physical activity, overweight or obesity.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 299 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 15 5%
United Kingdom 4 1%
Australia 2 <1%
Nigeria 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Slovenia 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Other 8 3%
Unknown 262 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 56 19%
Researcher 53 18%
Student > Master 43 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 13%
Student > Postgraduate 21 7%
Other 86 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 110 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 63 21%
Social Sciences 32 11%
Psychology 11 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 3%
Other 73 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 854. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2017.
All research outputs
#1,976
of 7,436,043 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#55
of 106,440 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29
of 113,791 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1
of 4,467 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,436,043 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 106,440 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 113,791 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,467 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.