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Mapping the Lay of the Land: Using Interactive Network Analytic Tools for Collaboration in Rural Cancer Prevention and Control

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, May 2022
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

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Title
Mapping the Lay of the Land: Using Interactive Network Analytic Tools for Collaboration in Rural Cancer Prevention and Control
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, May 2022
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-21-1446
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bobbi J. Carothers, Peg Allen, Callie Walsh-Bailey, Dixie Duncan, Rebeca Vanderburg Pacheco, Karen R. White, Debra Jeckstadt, Edward Tsai, Ross C. Brownson

Abstract

Cancer mortality rates in the U.S. are higher in rural than urban areas, especially for colorectal cancer. Modifiable cancer risks (e.g. tobacco use, obesity) are more prevalent among U.S. rural than urban residents. Social network analyses are common, yet rural informal collaborative networks for cancer prevention and control and practitioner uses of network findings are less well understood. In five service areas in rural Missouri and Illinois, we conducted a network survey of informal multisector networks among agencies that address cancer risk (N = 152 individuals). The survey asked about contact, collaborative activities, and referrals. We calculated descriptive network statistics and disseminated network visualizations with rural agencies through infographics and interactive Network Navigator platforms. We also collected feedback on uses of network findings from agency staff (N = 14). Service areas had more connections (average degree) for exchanging information than for more time-intensive collaborative activities of co-developing and sustaining ongoing services and programs, and co-developing and sharing resources. On average, collaborative activities were not dependent on just a few agencies to bridge gaps to hold networks together. Users found the network images and information useful for identifying gaps, planning which relationships to establish or enhance to strengthen certain collaborative activities and cross-referrals, and showing network strengths to current and potential funders. Rural informal cancer prevention and control networks in this study are highly connected and largely decentralized. Disseminating network findings help ensure usefulness to rural health and social service practitioners who address cancer risks.

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Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2022.
All research outputs
#5,839,654
of 21,235,767 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#1,599
of 4,306 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,104
of 259,270 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#11
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,235,767 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,306 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,270 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.