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Nutritional epidemiology: New perspectives for understanding the diet-disease relationship?

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, February 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
39 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
62 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
201 Mendeley
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Title
Nutritional epidemiology: New perspectives for understanding the diet-disease relationship?
Published in
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, February 2013
DOI 10.1038/ejcn.2013.47
Pubmed ID
Authors

H Boeing

Abstract

Nutritional epidemiology is a subdiscipline of epidemiology and provides specific knowledge to nutritional science. It provides data about the diet-disease relationships that is transformed by Public Health Nutrition into the practise of prevention. The specific contributions of nutritional epidemiology include dietary assessment, description of nutritional exposure and statistical modelling of the diet-disease relationship. In all these areas, substantial progress has been made over the last years and is described in this article. Dietary assessment is moving away from the food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) as main dietary assessment instrument in large-scale epidemiological studies towards the use of short-term quantitative instruments due to the potential of gross measurement errors. Web-based instruments for self-administration are therefore evaluated of being able to replace the costly interviewer conducted 24-h-recalls. Much interest is also directed towards the technique of taking and analysing photographs of all meals ingested, which might improve the dietary assessment in terms of precision. The description of nutritional exposure could greatly benefit from standardisation of the coding of foods across studies in order to improve comparability. For the investigations of bioactive substances as reflecting nutritional intake and status, the investigation of concentration measurements in body fluids as potential biomarkers will benefit from the new high-throughput technologies of mass spectrometry. Statistical modelling of the dietary data and the diet-disease relationships can refer to complex programmes that convert quantitative short-term measurements into habitual intakes of individuals and correct for the errors in the estimates of the diet-disease relationships by taking data from validation studies with biomarkers into account. For dietary data, substitution modelling should be preferred over simple adding modelling. More attention should also be put on the investigation of non-linear relationships. The increasing complexity of the conduct and analysis of nutritional epidemiological studies is calling for a distinct and advanced training programme for the young scientists moving into this area. This will also guarantee that in the future an increasing number of high-level manuscripts will show up in this and other journals in respect of nutritional epidemiological topics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 201 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 3 1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Cameroon 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 194 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 49 24%
Student > Master 39 19%
Student > Bachelor 26 13%
Researcher 23 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 6%
Other 32 16%
Unknown 19 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 49 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 33 16%
Social Sciences 12 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 3%
Other 29 14%
Unknown 35 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 40. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2021.
All research outputs
#691,295
of 18,917,096 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#294
of 3,586 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,441
of 163,316 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#3
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,917,096 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,586 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 163,316 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.