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Cognitive phenotypes in Alzheimer's disease and genetic risk.

Overview of attention for article published in Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior, October 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
162 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
140 Mendeley
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Title
Cognitive phenotypes in Alzheimer's disease and genetic risk.
Published in
Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior, October 2007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julie S Snowden, Cheryl L Stopford, Camille L Julien, Jennifer C Thompson, Yvonne Davidson, Linda Gibbons, Antonia Pritchard, Corinne L Lendon, Anna M Richardson, Anoop Varma, David Neary, David Mann, Snowden, Julie S, Stopford, Cheryl L, Julien, Camille L, Thompson, Jennifer C, Davidson, Yvonne, Gibbons, Linda, Pritchard, Antonia, Lendon, Corinne L, Richardson, Anna M, Varma, Anoop, Neary, David, Mann, David

Abstract

Variation in the clinical characteristics of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is increasingly recognised, although the factors underlying variation are not fully understood. The study examined the cognitive characteristics of 523 AD patients at the time of their presentation to a neurological dementia clinic and explored the relationship to family history and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype. Distinct profiles were identified, which were mirrored by topographical differences on neuroimaging. Clinical distinctions were maintained over time. Two-thirds of patients showed a constellation of deficits at presentation which included memory, language, visuospatial and constructional difficulties. However, a quarter had circumscribed presentations of amnesia, aphasia, perceptuospatial disorder or apraxia. The rare presence of frontal lobe characteristics was associated with a younger age of onset, an increased incidence of myoclonus at presentation, a positive family history but not with possession of APOE epsilon4 allele. An amnestic presentation (severe, yet circumscribed amnesia) was strongly associated with an older age of onset, a positive family history and the presence of APOE epsilon4 allele. Posterior cortical presentations showed a female bias, were typically sporadic, and showed no association with APOE epsilon4. The findings support the notion of phenotypic variation in AD, and show that genetic risk factors can influence clinical presentation. The findings draw attention to the specific association between APOE epsilon4 allele and memory but challenge the commonly held notion that the presence of the epsilon4 allele inevitably reduces onset age. The findings indicate that risk factors other than APOE epsilon4 allele underlie the non-familial, early onset posterior hemisphere presentations of AD.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 140 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 3 2%
Austria 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 133 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 20%
Student > Master 23 16%
Researcher 23 16%
Student > Bachelor 18 13%
Student > Postgraduate 9 6%
Other 25 18%
Unknown 14 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 41 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 31 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 10%
Neuroscience 13 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Other 12 9%
Unknown 26 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2008.
All research outputs
#707,808
of 4,681,163 outputs
Outputs from Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior
#232
of 943 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#614,694
of 3,602,320 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior
#192
of 778 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,681,163 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 943 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 3,602,320 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 778 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.