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Antidepressant Pharmaceuticals in Two U.S. Effluent-Impacted Streams: Occurrence and Fate in Water and Sediment, and Selective Uptake in Fish Neural Tissue

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, March 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
patent
1 patent

Citations

dimensions_citation
254 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
279 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Antidepressant Pharmaceuticals in Two U.S. Effluent-Impacted Streams: Occurrence and Fate in Water and Sediment, and Selective Uptake in Fish Neural Tissue
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, March 2010
DOI 10.1021/es9022706
Pubmed ID
Authors

Melissa M. Schultz, Edward T. Furlong, Dana. W. Kolpin, Stephen L. Werner, Heiko L. Schoenfuss, Larry B. Barber, Vicki S. Blazer, David O. Norris, Alan M. Vajda

Abstract

Antidepressant pharmaceuticals are widely prescribed in the United States; release of municipal wastewater effluent is a primary route introducing them to aquatic environments, where little is known about their distribution and fate. Water, bed sediment, and brain tissue from native white suckers (Catostomus commersoni) were collected upstream and at points progressively downstream from outfalls discharging to two effluent-impacted streams, Boulder Creek (Colorado) and Fourmile Creek (Iowa). A liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method was used to quantify antidepressants, including fluoxetine, norfluoxetine (degradate), sertraline, norsertraline (degradate), paroxetine, citalopram, fluvoxamine, duloxetine, venlafaxine, and bupropion in all three sample matrices. Antidepressants were not present above the limit of quantitation in water samples upstream from the effluent outfalls but were present at points downstream at ng/L concentrations, even at the farthest downstream sampling site 8.4 km downstream from the outfall. The antidepressants with the highest measured concentrations in both streams were venlafaxine, bupropion, and citalopram and typically were observed at concentrations of at least an order of magnitude greater than the more commonly investigated antidepressants fluoxetine and sertraline. Concentrations of antidepressants in bed sediment were measured at ng/g levels; venlafaxine and fluoxetine were the predominant chemicals observed. Fluoxetine, sertraline, and their degradates were the principal antidepressants observed in fish brain tissue, typically at low ng/g concentrations. A qualitatively different antidepressant profile was observed in brain tissue compared to streamwater samples. This study documents that wastewater effluent can be a point source of antidepressants to stream ecosystems and that the qualitative composition of antidepressants in brain tissue from exposed fish differs substantially from the compositions observed in streamwater and sediment, suggesting selective uptake.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 279 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 2%
Canada 2 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 261 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 74 27%
Student > Master 63 23%
Student > Bachelor 34 12%
Researcher 34 12%
Unspecified 18 6%
Other 56 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 92 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 76 27%
Chemistry 40 14%
Unspecified 29 10%
Engineering 12 4%
Other 30 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 25. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2017.
All research outputs
#461,792
of 10,782,532 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#784
of 11,089 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,820
of 125,844 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#21
of 206 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,782,532 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,089 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 125,844 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 206 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.