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Lipopolysaccharide Inhibits Th2 Lung Inflammation Induced by House Dust Mite Allergens in Mice

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, December 2012
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40 Mendeley
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Title
Lipopolysaccharide Inhibits Th2 Lung Inflammation Induced by House Dust Mite Allergens in Mice
Published in
American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, December 2012
DOI 10.1165/rcmb.2012-0331oc
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Daan de Boer

Abstract

The complex biology of asthma compels the use of more relevant human allergens, such as house dust mite (HDM), to improve the translation of animal models into human asthma. LPS exposure is associated with aggravations of asthma, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we studied the effects of increasing LPS doses on HDM-evoked allergic lung inflammation. To this end, mice were intranasally sensitized and challenged with HDM with or without increasing doses of LPS (0.001-10 μg). LPS dose-dependently inhibited HDM-induced eosinophil recruitment into the lungs and mucus production in the airways. LPS attenuated the production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13) in HDM-challenged lungs, while enhancing the HDM-induced release of IL-17, IL-33, IFN-γ, and TNF-α. The shift toward a Th1 inflammatory response was further illustrated by predominant neutrophilic lung inflammation after LPS administration at higher doses. LPS did not influence HDM-induced plasma IgE concentrations. Although LPS did not significantly affect the activation of coagulation or complement in HDM-challenged lungs, it reduced HDM-initiated endothelial cell activation. This study is the first to provide insights into the effects of LPS in an allergic lung inflammation model making use of a clinically relevant allergen without a systemic adjuvant, revealing that LPS dose-dependently inhibits HDM-induced pulmonary Th2 responses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 5%
Japan 1 3%
Belgium 1 3%
Sweden 1 3%
Netherlands 1 3%
Unknown 34 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Master 5 13%
Unspecified 3 8%
Other 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 35%
Unspecified 4 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Other 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2013.
All research outputs
#9,082,096
of 11,344,729 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology
#1,843
of 2,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,299
of 128,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology
#9
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,344,729 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,085 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 128,468 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.