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Fluctuations in Tat copy number when it counts the most: a possible mechanism to battle the HIV latency

Overview of attention for article published in Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling, March 2013
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Title
Fluctuations in Tat copy number when it counts the most: a possible mechanism to battle the HIV latency
Published in
Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling, March 2013
DOI 10.1186/1742-4682-10-16
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zoran Konkoli, Aldo Jesorka

Abstract

The HIV-1 virus can enter a dormant state and become inactive, which reduces accessibility by antiviral drugs. We approach this latency problem from an unconventional point of view, with the focus on understanding how intrinsic chemical noise (copy number fluctuations of the Tat protein) can be used to assist the activation process of the latent virus. Several phase diagrams have been constructed in order to visualize in which regions of the parameter space noise can drive the activation process. Essential to the study is the use of a hyperbolic coordinate system, which greatly facilitates quantification of how the various reaction rate combinations shape the noise behavior of the Tat protein feedback system. We have designed a mathematical manual of how to approach the problem of activation quantitatively, and introduce the notion of an "operating point" of the virus. For both noise-free and noise-based strategies we show how operating point off-sets induce changes in the number of Tat molecules. The major result of the analysis is that for every noise-free strategy there is a noise-based strategy that requires lower dosage, but achieves the same anti-latency effect. It appears that the noise-based activation is advantageous for every operating point.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 8%
France 1 8%
Unknown 10 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 25%
Student > Bachelor 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 17%
Unknown 3 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 42%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Physics and Astronomy 1 8%
Unknown 3 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 March 2013.
All research outputs
#3,547,989
of 4,507,144 outputs
Outputs from Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling
#126
of 164 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,940
of 89,132 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling
#6
of 7 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 164 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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