↓ Skip to main content

Evidence that Life History Characteristics of Wild Birds Influence Infection and Exposure to Influenza A Viruses

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, March 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Evidence that Life History Characteristics of Wild Birds Influence Infection and Exposure to Influenza A Viruses
Published in
PLOS ONE, March 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0057614
Pubmed ID
Authors

Craig R. Ely, Jeffrey S. Hall, Joel A. Schmutz, John M. Pearce, John Terenzi, James S. Sedinger, Hon S. Ip

Abstract

We report on life history characteristics, temporal, and age-related effects influencing the frequency of occurrence of avian influenza (AI) viruses in four species of migratory geese breeding on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska. Emperor geese (Chen canagica), cackling geese (Branta hutchinsii), greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons), and black brant (Branta bernicla), were all tested for active infection of AI viruses upon arrival in early May, during nesting in June, and while molting in July and August, 2006-2010 (n = 14,323). Additionally, prior exposure to AI viruses was assessed via prevalence of antibodies from sera samples collected during late summer in 2009 and 2010. Results suggest that geese are uncommonly infected by low pathogenic AI viruses while in Alaska. The percent of birds actively shedding AI viruses varied annually, and was highest in 2006 and 2010 (1-3%) and lowest in 2007, 2008, and 2009 (<0.70%). Contrary to findings in ducks, the highest incidence of infected birds was in late spring when birds first arrived from staging and wintering areas. Despite low prevalence, most geese were previously exposed to AI viruses, as indicated by high levels of seroprevalence during late summer (47%-96% across species; n = 541). Seroprevalence was >95% for emperor geese, a species that spends part of its life cycle in Asia and is endemic to Alaska and the Bering Sea region, compared to 40-60% for the other three species, whose entire life cycles are within the western hemisphere. Birds <45 days of age showed little past exposure to AI viruses, although antibodies were detected in samples from 5-week old birds in 2009. Seroprevalence of known age black brant revealed that no birds <4 years old had seroconverted, compared to 49% of birds ≥4 years of age.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
Unknown 41 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 19%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 7%
Other 9 21%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 42%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 14%
Environmental Science 3 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 5 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2021.
All research outputs
#4,947,485
of 18,068,324 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#54,153
of 168,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,546
of 160,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#1,351
of 4,672 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,068,324 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 168,224 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 160,414 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,672 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.