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The importance of metagenomic surveys to microbial ecology: or why Darwin would have been a metagenomic scientist

Overview of attention for article published in Microbial Informatics and Experimentation, June 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
17 tweeters
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
151 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The importance of metagenomic surveys to microbial ecology: or why Darwin would have been a metagenomic scientist
Published in
Microbial Informatics and Experimentation, June 2011
DOI 10.1186/2042-5783-1-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jack A Gilbert, Ronald O'Dor, Nicholas King, Timothy M Vogel

Abstract

Scientific discovery is incremental. The Merriam-Webster definition of 'Scientific Method' is "principles and procedures for the systematic pursuit of knowledge involving the recognition and formulation of a problem, the collection of data through observation and experiment, and the formulation and testing of hypotheses". Scientists are taught to be excellent observers, as observations create questions, which in turn generate hypotheses. After centuries of science we tend to assume that we have enough observations to drive science, and enable the small steps and giant leaps which lead to theories and subsequent testable hypotheses. One excellent example of this is Charles Darwin's Voyage of the Beagle, which was essentially an opportunistic survey of biodiversity. Today, obtaining funding for even small-scale surveys of life on Earth is difficult; but few argue the importance of the theory that was generated by Darwin from his observations made during this epic journey. However, these observations, even combined with the parallel work of Alfred Russell Wallace at around the same time have still not generated an indisputable 'law of biology'. The fact that evolution remains a 'theory', at least to the general public, suggests that surveys for new data need to be taken to a new level.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 151 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 10 7%
Brazil 3 2%
Denmark 2 1%
Finland 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Bulgaria 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 4 3%
Unknown 126 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 39 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 21%
Student > Master 24 16%
Student > Bachelor 14 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 7%
Other 28 19%
Unknown 5 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 95 63%
Environmental Science 21 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 9%
Computer Science 5 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 3%
Other 4 3%
Unknown 9 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2019.
All research outputs
#903,413
of 15,150,979 outputs
Outputs from Microbial Informatics and Experimentation
#3
of 15 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#865,327
of 14,251,015 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbial Informatics and Experimentation
#3
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,150,979 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 15 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.4. This one scored the same or higher as 12 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 14,251,015 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.